How do I get my husband to better for his diabetes?

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His blood sugar is rising to 192 age '79 He's been sick with flu fo almost two weeks. Is not on medication

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There are good tips above.

I'm a Type I diabetic and therefore take insulin, so, I'm not that familiar with Type II regimens, but I can relate to how he may feel timid to be honest with the doctor. For some reasons, we are embarrassed if our blood sugars run too high. I learned that the doctor is there to help and not judge. If he's judging, find another doctor. Their goal is to help the patient get the number within control. An A1C should be an indicator how it's going. Why not ask about a pill to take that will help lower it, if the A1C is too high? Has the doctor offered that yet? Do you know what his A1C was?

If his blood sugar levels are closer to normal, he will surely feel better. I can attest to that. Good luck with it!
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Marvogsally, so he is a fiction writer -- what do you expect him to tell the doctor? :)

Has he managed his blood sugars pretty well for 2 years without any medications? That is pretty impressive. But diabetes is a progressive disease and it tends to decide on its own when to get harder to manage. So minimize the blame, the accusations, the "you should haves" and be sympathetic. Time to go back to the doctor, with some non-fiction this time, renew previous efforts that worked and also, perhaps, take a medication. Nearly all type 2 diabetics try medformin at some point. It is well tested, inexpensive, and generally safe. It can cause digestive upsets in some people. In any case, it is up to a doctor to decide what steps to take next.

BTW, you didn't answer when the numbers are high, and what his A1c results are.

In my book, the two most important management factors (other than meds) are
1) portion control and
2) activity

There really isn't much he can't eat -- but quantity is critical. A person with diabetes can eat an ear of corn, a dinner roll, potato salad, chips, baked beans, and a brownie -- but not all at one sitting, please! Some people need to give up dessert cold turkey, but many of us can stick with it better with reasonable treats now and then.

I find portion-controlled items useful. If I buy a box of ice-cream sandwiches I never eat more than one at a time. If I scoop ice cream out of the carton myself, well, let's just say I'm not as exact as the manufacturer that pre-measures.

Physical activity doesn't have to be Official Exercise Done at a Gym. It can be a walk around the neighborhood, mowing the lawn, a swim, anything that uses muscles.

In general, the heart-healthy diet or the Mediterranean diet are often recommended.

If it has been two years, take another nutrition session together!
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I'll explain thinks a little clearer. He was diagnosed with type 2diabetes 2 years ago. Up until 2009 when I met through eharmony on line. He was pretty healthy He and I were both widows. He developed COPD but it is controlled. 2 years aGo wth Kaiser we both went to classes for nutrition to help his diabetes. It worked for awhile. He is short and weighs 200lbs. Great guy. A writer of mystery novels. Ma in literature. Etc. he is nit truthful with doc
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I forgot to add that infections can cause blood glucose to go up some. If it has only been high since he came down with the flu, I would suspect it was the infection. If so, it should go back down when he is feeling better. It is a strange time of the year for the flu if you're in the northern hemisphere. I hope you'll encourage him to get his flu vaccine when it is available this fall.
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Jeanne asked what I was going to. 192 would be a high fasting glucose reading, but a fairly normal after-eating glucose. We would have to know when the readings were taken. Managing his diabetes is up to a few people -- the person with the diabetes, the person preparing the meals, and the person buying the groceries. What does your husband do that throws his sugar off? Does he go out to eat or buy candy? Or does he snack on things at home?
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When was he diagnosed with diabetes? What was his A1C then? What was it most recently?

The 192 reading -- when is that taken? First thing in morning? Right before a meal? Soon after a meal? When?

How long have those high numbers been happening? Any illness plays absolute havoc with blood sugar levels. What were his numbers like before he got sick?

Insurance must cover diabetes education for patients. Medicare does. Have he been to educational sessions? Did you go with him?

Sorry for so many questions, but the answers to you would be different if he's had diabetes since he was 60 and it has been controlled until now or this is brand new. So more information will help us help you.
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He is on no medicine? is he perhaps listed as Prediabetic? I just was, and in addition to lots of nutrition advice, I was put on Metformin for the next 6 months while I try to get some weight off and learn to eat better ( oh boy and I love my bread...) I am learning to eat more lean meat,, etc. Tonight is salisbury steak and cauliflower mash instead of potatoes.. maybe you can tweek some of his favorite recipes. Or has he just lost his appetite? The flu can take that out of you fast, and not eating will mess with your blood sugars from what I am learning. Have you spoken to his Dr?
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Does he use Ketone sticks to monitor his urine? That helps detect serious problems that can occur from high blood sugars. Frequent testing is good, but if he's not improving ask the doctor what's next?
Has his doctor discussed things like diet and exercise? That's a big deal, especially for a senior. I think I might ask the doctor to do explain things to him. Do you think he can understand what the doctor is saying? Is he able to process it?
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That was supposed to read eat better. No medication for diabetes now
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I would contact his doctor. High blood sugar levels are dangerous. Is he refusing to take meds? Is he competent to make his own health care choices?
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