How does Social Security notify recipients of the amount they have received in benefits each year?

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I have to find information regarding the amount my father receives from Social Security each year.


How does Social Security notify recipients of the amount they have received in benefits each year?


Is the 1099-R the only thing Social Security sends to recipients, at least when their money is direct deposited?


My father receives 2 pensions that are direct deposited into his bank account. His memory is hindered by a mild stroke and early stage dementia so he is unreliable but said he thinks Social Security is incorporated in one of his pensions. Is this possible? The monthly statement from his pensions is not broken down showing Social Security income. He is a retired manager of the railroad if that makes any difference.


I have been handling his finances and nothing has come in the mail directly from Social Security during the last 2 years.


I went through his tax forms prepared by a CPA and saw that one 1099-R had the top coupon in tact which stated an amount from Social Security. However, none of his other tax forms has this portion of the 1099-R if there are any 1099-R's with the forms.


Is the 1099-R the only thing Social Security sends to recipients, at least when their money is direct deposited?


I have tried to set up an account at the Social Security website but they ask a series of questions to verify identity and I do not recognize some of the options. My father cannot remember. Frankly, I would not remember accounts from 2007 or the affiliated odd company behind a loan myself. I have 2 file boxes of sorted documents and I could not find anything coinciding with the options listed.


Once you miss an answer they lock you out. The first time was 24 hours. The second time was permanent. I am trying to handle this in my spare (what is that?) time. I don't have time to make calls during business hours and cannot wait on hold.


Next week I plan to contact his accountant and ask whether they have information on this.


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If he retired as an employee of a RR, then he most likely is in the RRB system and not SS. we've had RRB in our family and it's quite quite different to deal with.

RRB has field offices all over the US, both the usual big cities but also places where there was a big railhead in the past (like Joliet& Albuquerque). I'd suggest you call the field office closest to you and set up an appointment for your dad. RRB record keeping is pretty tight so IF dad is within RRB system, the details on his work history & retirement -which is called an annuity - will be found & in detail.

RRB pays really really high compared to SS for those up in age (like in their 90's). If you are thinking that dad will get Medicaid to pay for his long term care...well It could be that your dads RRB is going to be over the monthly income ceiling for Medicaid eligibility. Most states Medicaid have monthly income max about $ 2,100 (some are lower too like $ 1,800). It's not unusual for RRB to pay 3k, 4k or more each month. So way, way over Medicaid limits. it could well be that the "gap" between RRB $ and private pay rate at a NH is pretty small so family just pays the "gap" rather than deal with Medicaid, having to do a miller trust, etc.

Also MediCARE under RRB has totally different coding. If his health providers or the facility he is at isn't used to RRB medicare & use traditional medicare codes to file for payment there is going to be problems. It can morph into a real clawback clusterF to deal with. Medicare for RRB is done by Palmetto in GA. & they do a most excellent job. If there are oodles of other RRB at the facility or they are in a big railhead community, billing should know what to do to get Palmetto paid for medicare services. It's the situation -in my experience - where your elder is the only RRB resident ever that there's problems.
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Railroad retirement is not part of the social security system. So railroad retirees do not get social security because they never paid into it. My husband was employed by the railroad briefly. If a railroad employee or his or her survivors do not qualify for railroad retirement benefits, the RRB transfers the employee's railroad retirement credits to the Social Security Administration, where they are treated as social security credits. So if Dad worked all his career at the railroad, he never paid into SS.
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