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I visited my old friend today and when I asked why she had a line in her hand, her caregiver said she was getting fluids as she became dehydrated.

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If your friend cannot pick up a cup and drink it himself there's the answer to the problem the staff is to busy and hes only getting fluids at meal times, if he can drink himself its just a matter of the body not sending signals to the brain that he needs to drink which is not uncommon in the elderly or like others stated, just over coming infection, flu, ect. will do it to ask his nurse next time if its a routine thing or is it just because of a sickness.
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Be careful of too much coffee during the day, that can jump start dehydration.
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Swallowing difficulties are a frequent cause of elders not drinking enough. Just be thankful the facility had noticed it and were tsking steps to correct the problem
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It can happen anywhere. NFL players get carried away in the middle of a game with dehydration. Swimmers get it in the ocean. Kittens and puppies can get it and be dead in 24 hours without fluids if they get diarrhea.
Construction workers are at risk too. Maybe that's why they drink all that coffee.
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Let them know he likes to drink gingerale and find out if they have it they should have snack cart being brought around check if gingerale is a choose
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Having a father in a Memory Care Unit, I will also say, that it's possible for the eldery, due to their memory issues, to not even be in touch with the fact that they are thirsty....so if a drink is not offered, they will not even think about asking for something to drink. My Dad won't ask staff for ANYTHING....he thinks they are the bosses, and he must do as they say. Funny thinking. Mom will walk in to visit and will say, Are you hungry, Are you thirsty and immediately he is...and if she brings him a ginger ale or apple juice, he hogs it down. He does NOT like water at all...never has...so if staff do offer that, he'll take one swallow and set it down. So that could be part of it too. Otherwise, all the other answers posted are all good ones that add to dehydration as well.
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I worked as an aide in a nursing home and we were constantly bringing residents things to drink, and had to chart how many ounces they had drunk during our shifts, so the nurses could monitor the residents' intake. Even still, some residents would get dehydrated for various reasons-- disinterest in drinking/eating, swallowing problems, prescription side effects, diarrhea, dementia, wanting to limit bathroom trips... It is difficult, but maybe as her friend you (or her family) could supply drinks that she might have more interest in--maybe she loves cranberry juice or ginger ale and likes her water with a squeeze of lemon. Or maybe she's always loved sparkling water rather than still. I know at our facility, we had a kitchenette with a refrigerator for our residents where they could keep any snacks or drinks they wanted, and they just had to ask me and I'd get it for them as long as there weren't any restrictions against them having that particular item. Also someone could speak with the facility about providing more broth-based soups, fruits and veggies that have high water content (like cantaloupe, watermelon, cherry tomatoes, celery, cucumber, strawberries etc.).
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First it's a nursing home, and staff is busy... Mio flavor liquid drops, or Crystal light ligquid drops makes water more fun/flavorful.... It's hard to monitor. Now check for UTI, pressure sores.....dehyrdration is not good hard on kidneys, etc...
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Loose diarrhea not wanting to drink and different tastes buds jello is helpful and try different juices gemma
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I went to visit my friend in a nursing home and when I asked why she had a line in her hand the caregiver said it was fluids as she was dehydrated. I thought it strange this could happen.
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A lot of seniors don't drink as much as they should because they want to limit how often they need to use the bathroom. Sometimes they're on diuretics to lower their blood pressure or treat congestive heart failure, and they pee more than they can take in. All you can do is offer, and if they're able to understand 'why' they should drink more, then perhaps they will. Bear in mind that jello and broth and sherbet and soups add fluids to the diet and may be taken more willingly. You can also motivate some elders to drink more by reminding them it can help prevent constipation.
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In general, I think elders are less apt to get dehydrated in a care center than in their own homes, because care centers are usually really good about offering beverages frequently. Someone is always offering my mother a little can of gingerale, refreshing her thermal cup of ice water, asking if she wants milk with her cookie. But it is hard to insist that someone drink or eat. Those who are sick or coming down with something and don't feel much like eating and sleep instead of having a snack are probably most vulnerable. Let's home your freind's center detected the problem early and is treating it appropriately.
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People sometimes get dehydrated when they don't take in enough fluids. As we age, some of us apparently lose our sense of thirst.
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