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Cost for facilities are so expensive our money will not last long. How about care for myself down the road? There may not be any funds left. We have no Long Term Insurance.

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As others have stated, Medicaid planning is not a a do-it-yourself task, because of the complexities of both the federal and state laws, regulations, and practices. However, it is a good idea to arm yourself with knowledge of what the rules are and what the possibilities are to protect your assets, before you visit with an elder law attorney. Indeed, I even include a section of my book that gives some tips on how to find a good attorney. (www.MedicaidSecrets.com) Good luck!!
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See an elder law attorney to assist with financial planning and Medicaid. You will not lose your home, Medicaid will place liens on it to recoup care expenses. You can remain in the house.
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Medicaid planning when here is a CS - Community Spouse- is complex. You need an attorney to review your situation come up with options BEFORE a Medicaid application is ever done. Medicaid does not expect the CS to themselves become impoverished. Only the NH spouse needs to be. But how to best do that is not a DIY.

I’d suggest you get an atty who is CELA or NAELA.
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Definitely see an attorney who specializes in Elder Law.
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Agreed with suggestions about NAELA attorneys, but keep in mind that not all are the same. Some good, some not. Most give you a free consultation first, so call up 4-5 and pretend you want to do business with them. From each free session, you will learn more and more what to ask and compare your notes on them. Hopefully, you will arrive at one that suits you the best.

Do research on them online. Three immediate questions to ask all of them are: Are they certified? How much experience do they have with Medicaid planning? Can they respond to questions by email and quickly? I find email answers are useful because I can always go back to them to reread their answers. You wont remember every little fact they tell you verbally.

Good luck.
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Get the home in your name only well before welfare is needed.
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You definitely need to see an elder law attorney for Medicaid planning. You need a good lawyer. Here's my recommendation on how to make sure you get a competent lawyer.

Contact your local chapter of the Alzheimer's association. They all have support groups. Join one. Even if it's temporary. Even if your spouse has not be diagnosed with Alzheimer's per se. The reason for this is, they have resources. They have relationships with reputable elder law attorneys. Often, these attorneys do free Medicaid planning seminars or informational sessions for support group members. Attend one (or two) and ask a lot of questions. These attorneys have been vetted by the Alzheimer's association, and often, their firms are accepting new clients.

That should really be your first step. Good luck. And if there is no seminar scheduled, ask for whatever information they have from previous seminars, or simply ask them for a referral. Their whole purpose is to help the people dealing with cognitive impairment, and their families.
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It is imperative to get an elder attorney, and I agree, they are not all the same. I saw three before I chose one, and feel like I got really lucky. Depending on the rules in your state, there are a number of things that can be done to protect your assets. In some cases, a judge can issue a protective order that would allow you to keep everything and your husband would immediately qualify for Medicaid. Good luck, it’s a long journey.
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Had the same concern about losing my home. I see the funds going down fast after two years in ALZ care facility. My understanding is when all his savings are gone a lien will be placed on our home. I cannot be forced out of my home or left without any funds to continue to live here. When I pass the funds owed to the facility will be paid from the estate. Whatever is left after that goes to family.
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I'll add that I have attended 3 of these seminars and the attorney explained how the community spouse is able to keep the house and virtually all the assets, but this HAS to be set up right.
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