How do you know if you are starting to get Alzheimer's?

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I am getting very forgetful.

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I remember watching on TV that if you say out loud for example "I'm putting the car keys on the kitchen table" that you will remember their location a lot quicker. But the main thing is to remember to say it out loud.
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Fight the fear!
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Yes, statins can cause brain fog, been there, done that, cleared a lot when I got off the stuff. And don't forget about the possibility of an infection somewhere.
The forgetting stuff from one room to another is really common; I read recently that the brain can have a "reset" when moving through a doorway. I find it helps if remind myself what I'm going for as I go through the doorway.
And of course, we have to actually MAKE the memory. It's easy to get distracted when, for example, walking into the house and drop the keys somewhere without actually noting where they are.
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I've heard that statins can cause brain fog too. So, it's difficult to know what is causing what.

I want to see the movie Still Alice (about woman with early onset Alzheimers), but I'm afraid it might upset me. I've been dealing with my cousin who has severe dementia since this summer and I've had little time to think of much else. Perhaps I should skip that movie and go for something a little more cheerful.
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Sunnygirl, you are so right about reading about elder/disability issues that I tend to over think and worry too much about my own memory issues. I even look twice at my sig other any time he forgets something, then I have to remember he's been forgetful his whole life according to his family.... the absent minded processor. Sometimes I wished I didn't know about this stuff :P

Blood pressure pills can give you brain fog... I had to ask my cardiologist if I could reduce the mg I was taking because of it, and she was fine with that as long as I was wasn't experiencing any heart symptoms. Whew, what a relief :)
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You might also look into any medications you are taking and vitamin deficiencies. I've read that certain meds can cause a lot of brain fog.

I also think that reading about elder/disability issues and caring for elders and the disabled, puts memory issues on your mind and makes you think about it much more than the average person would.
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Are you under any particular stress right now? For about 6 months after my husband died my mental lapses were bad enough to interfere with normal functioning. I tried to pay for my groceries with a library card, I needed a written list to come back with one item. I was assured by mental health professionals that this was a not-very-common but not abnormal form of grief. They were apparently right. Now (2 years later) I can shop for up to 3 items without a list, and I only try to pay with my credit card!

So if there is something unusually stressful going on in your life right now, try to relax a little, write yourself notes to supplement your memory, and see if it improves when the stress eases up.

If that doesn't seem to apply, write down forgetful instances so you can explain to your doctor what is concerning you, and ask for the basic short tests. That may be enough to reassure you, or, possibly, indicate the need for further testing.

Is there anything besides forgetfulness that worries you? Do you have a hard time making decisions, or understanding conversations, or recognizing familiar people or things? Have trouble finding a word when you are talking? Again, try keeping written notes about anything unusual like this, and add that to what you talk to the doctor about.

I've known two people who had early-onset dementia and both of them were aware that something was wrong early on. So I won't dismiss your concerns out of hand. If you are worried enough to come here and post about it, it is probably worth keeping some records and discussing with your doctor. Chances are very good that it is not dementia, but you deserve a more informed answer.
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Same here, 63. Go to the kitchen and then forget why I am there. I figured the blessing of dementia is that you don't know it when you really have it. It's this in between time here that you either laugh at yourself or go nasty. Try to avoid nasty.
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Theresa, I'm 61 and my memory is nowhere as good as it was 10 years ago. The way it's been explained to me, most dementias are not so much about being forgetful ( where did I put my keys?) as it's about forgetting how to do things, like how to use a phone, or putting the milk in the cupboard.

That being said, talk to your doctor about it for sure.
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