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My dad will be fine one minute and then he is upset and mad about something he thinks I or someone has told him, and the information isn't even correct and I try to explain and he just gets more upset and walks away or stops talking to me, one time we didn't speak for a day and half.

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What you are describing is someone who is experiencing some frustration, and possibly some depression which can manifest as anger as often as sadness and withdrawal. I am assuming there are no new physical changes or challenges and that mentally he is stable overall.
I read in your profile that you don't currently live with Dad? But you are helping him out. If this is new behavior for Dad he may be experiencing some changes in mentation. If this is not new it may simply be that you are currently having a bit more contact than is good for either of you, so withdraw a bit. Do know that any "explaining" to him may come over as "argument", and just don't bother. Figure out ways to redirect the subject. Just go home a bit earlier when things get a bit more testy. Wishing you good luck. An example would help us answer different ways to respond.
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Reply to AlvaDeer
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Dont try to explain. Just redirect. Oh dad your favorite show is on in 10 mins. You-*gets all excited. Time to have that nice cup of soup etc. I wouldn't even have a discussion about it. Waste of talking. Might not even register. They are convinced of what they think.

Id talk to doc about meds. It is common for those in middle/advanced dementia to be agitated, paranoid about items/checks, stolen, spouse cheating etc. The brain is shrinking and plaqs build up. It might be the difference of you getting hit and them being calm. It can be very scary when they are convinced of something. The meds help with agitation if it is starting to happen more often.

I had a woman in NH corner me in dad's room screaming at me. Said I stole her welfare cheque. I thought she was going to slap me. I was very concerned for my safety. Id have to do a dive over the bed to get away from her. I made sure never to sit where I could be cornered again. A nurse came in and redirected her. Thank goodness!!! I was about to be hit.
If you can't redirect, Id leave room or say very little. When agitated they want to argue. People can't argue with themselves.
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Reply to Jasmina
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Dear April, it might help if you give us a few more details – your age, father’s age, who lives with whom on what terms etc. Your post almost sounds like a very young person, stuck in a situation they know very little about. If you could tell us more, you could get more helpful support and suggestions. Love, Margaret
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Reply to MargaretMcKen
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Never mind trying to explain or trying to correct your dad's statements. Most of the misconceptions or faulty memories will have no impact on keeping him safe and clean and healthy.
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Reply to RedVanAnnie
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When parents get older their hormones change. My mother is like this. She is a bit
bi polar. One moment she is happy and if I say or do one thing that is different from giving her attention and she gets upset. Just let your father be. Older people's hormones and moods change fast. Their body hurts and they don't like being old. I know my mother does not and so they get angry, nasty, etc.
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Reply to lindas12
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Imho, do not engage in unpleasantries. Turn the conversation around to something that he likes.
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Reply to Llamalover47
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Emotional lability is what you are describing. It can happen with hormone level fluctuations, strokes, and some types of dementia. Please talk to your dad's doctor about this to get it evaluated. Treatment depends on cause. In the meant time, trying to reason a person out of a bad mood doesn't work. Acknowledge that the person appears upset. Try to find out the cause, so you have a clue if you can resolve it. If it is not reality-based, try diverting attention to another topic or activity. If the mood swings are bordering on becoming violent, his doctor can prescribe anti-anxiety agents to decrease his anxiety and frustration.
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Reply to Taarna
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This may or may not work for you, but my dad is similar. He gets annoyed by every little thing, and complains a LOT. Today, I brought him the shower back brush he requested because he cannot reach his feet. As I handed it to him, I said, "Dad, now I know that the handle will be either too long or too short, and the bristles will be too firm or too limp, and that you won't like the color blue anymore. So you're welcome to complain about this all you want, and then go get yourself what you really wanted." He laughed sheepishly, admitted that it was probably no good, and the mood passed.

Thing is, he really can't go get himself what he will want, it isn't made like they did it in the old days anyway, and he doesn't remember where to shop for stuff like that. But the gentle jibe I gave him made him smile and diverted what would have likely been 10 minutes of complaints if I hadn't. Humor helps, at least in his case.

Best wishes. I know that it is really hard to deal with when they're irrational.
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Reply to SeniorStruggles
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Maybe he has onset dementia.

Dont try to explain.
Next time, Just say he misunderstood or you didn't explain yourself correctly and if he walks off, let him and don't fuse with him.

If he walks off, just write a letter and let him know whatever happened and leave it for him
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Reply to bevthegreat
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Is Dad independent - running his home ok? Cooks, shops, bathing, washes clothes, paying bills himself?
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Reply to Beatty
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