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I would start with letting them know that due to his health, he will not be able to move in and see how they respond. I would be prepared to at least lose the deposit. Worse case, they can sue for all rent that would have been due for the term of the lease contract. Or until the apartment is rented to someone else. If they have multiple units available, this may be the last one they fill as they are getting rent no matter what. If they go this route, you can try telling them the Dr has declared him incompetent to sign the lease but it may still end up in small claims court. I'm only bringing up this scenario as it happened to me years ago. I rented an apartment with a friend but mine was the only signature on the lease. When she moved in with her boyfriend 2 months later, I was stuck with an apartment I couldn't afford, in a strange city and wasn't able to find anyone to move in to share the cost. Long story but no sympathy when I had to break the lease.

Hopefully they will be understanding. Esp if he hasn't moved anything in yet so there is no need to re-clean the apartment, you may be in luck.
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Most leases have a healthcare exception that would allow him to get out of his lease. There may be a month's rent due, or if the leasing office is agreeable, they may understand his healthcare needs. Talk to them and be very nice. Then pack and leave...
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A lease is a contract. It fulfills all the laws of contract if signed by both parties. Some leases have a 60- day clause for both tenant and landlord. It MAY state that either party has a right to vacate. " Notice to Vacate" ( from the landlord) and " Notice of Intent to Vacate" from the tenant may allow the lease to be changed. The deposit, whether it be a security deposit or a damage deposit, may be a different issue.
As offered by pstieqman, I'd tread carefully on this one also. Why does he want to return to your home? Why did he want to lease an apt. in the first place?
You don't "just leave", StandingAlone. There are many issues here.

"Notice of Intent to Vacate" ( from the tenant)
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Tread carefully with this one, as dementia advances the patient will constantly change their mind. You bring him back home, he gets bored, wants to move again. You might be better off to get him a housekeeper once a week or a visiting nurse if he needs one. Time for a long chat with his MD about what his options are.
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If the landlord is an understanding person he or she should let him out of the lease or a doctor's statement.
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I am not an attorney but have been a landlord for thirty years. A lease is usually binding unless you can prove that your father was not able to sign by diminished capacity but most landlords should work with you. You might have to pay next month's rent and pay for the cost (ads) to re-rent the apartment but I would ask the landlord if you help to re-rent the apartment if they (landlord) would be willing to let him break his lease. I have done such thing for my tenants in the past.
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Often a lease can be suspended (with deposit returned) if a doctor stipulates that it is medically necessary for the person to not be on his/her own. Check with the leasing manager.
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You can get out of any lease. You just leave. You just don't leave with your deposit. That's forfeit.
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