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Do we really know what is THEIR best interest. Remember we are dealing with possible cognitive problems. This can include depression, lack of motivation & inability to process what "we" might think is best. It is very much working with what they enjoy.
I say this with respect as I would dislike someone forcing there will onto me. Albeit it might lengthen my life.
I am a retired palliative care nurse & have a husband with Lewy Body Dementia & now Pakinson's. I have exhausted myself trying to force onto him what I know will be beneficial. He then becomes combative & depressed. I now work with what he wants for his end of life Thinking of you at this time.
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Denial, procrastination and depression. I dealt with all of it. I would suggest trying to help get her therapies set up for in-home. She might be less likely to cancel if she doesn't have to go out, and they can help her with how to do the exercises in her own home. And please be patient with her. I pushed Dad so hard sometimes, and yet the disease takes its toll anyway.
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That's what we're struggling with as well. She makes appointments for all of the things she needs to be catching up on, but usually ends up canceling or not showing up. My boyfriend and I work full time and can't always get the time off work to take her so it's difficult for us to make sure she's going. We're tempted to start using the grandchild card as a little bit of blackmail saying we're worried she won't be around when we start having children and we would really love for them to know their grandmother so she needs to take care of her health. I'm not sure if this would be more harmful than helpful though.
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How old is your mom? Sounds like she's suffering from some depression. Has that been a part of her past history? What's her diet like?
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She says that she believes everything we are suggesting are good ideas, but she won't follow through with any of them. For example we made numerous physical therapy appointments for her and she has cancelled every one, even when I was going to take her and be with her for support, she just says she doesn't feel good and can't go. I know she doesn't feel well often, but I truly believe she would feel better if she could follow through with exercise, etc.
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Jennyb1972 -- is she flat out refusing or just kind of shrugging things off when you mention/tell her about them?

My bf's mom is in the same situation, just recently diagnosed, and she just kind of acts like everything is no big deal when we're concerned about her eating habits, lack of movement, and absurd sleep habits. I'm interested in what others are experiencing with their PD parents.
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Thanks for your ideas, it has just been so hard to motivate her to participate in anything. I guess I need to start thinking outside of the box and get a little creative like you suggested, Garden Artist. Thanks!
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Well, if she has Parkinson's, she probably doesn't feel that comfortable exercising, but there's a dance movement which I've learned about that seems to be working miracles.

Check out danceforparkinsons.org, or google Dance for Parkinson's if the link is deleted. It's a movement begun by professional dancers who wanted to reach out to people with movement disorders. I watched a PBS special and was so taken by the effects that just moving to the rhythm of music had on people with PD. It was very emotional.

The movement has spread, nationwide to worldwide. Watch the video on the website. If you can't get to a class, a DVD might help. Do the movements with your mother, and try them out with some of her favorite songs.

And beyond that, I think in many ways we think of elders who aren't caring for themselves as a unique population group, when in reality there are many younger people destroying their health by engaging in similarly unhealthy behaviors.

So I'm wondering if a common denominator could reach both population groups? If so, perhaps (beyond the dance groups) maybe there's a different way to reach people who've lost interest in caring for themselves. Just thinking out loud here.....

But perhaps you could also start with something simple, to her favorite music. Maybe just having a cup of coffee or tea or good healthy meal with her favorite music in the background. Music can work miracles.
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Would need to know a little more about this situation. Dementia involved?
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