How do I go about becoming POA for my Mom? My sister is currently POA.

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Okay, My mother was diagnosed in Feb 2013, with Dementia/Psycosis, my sister became her POA in May 2012. I moved back home to help my mother in June 2012. My mother's house was rented out in April of last year so me and my mother got a smaller house, my mother pays 800.00 for rent. I pay all of the utilities and food and and provide my mother with mani/pedicures I work everyday, I pick up and pay the small co pay for her medication, my sister lives 2 blocks away and does absolutely nothing,my mother's house has now gone into foreclosure, (have proof) my mother's tenants was paying rent my sister was not paying the mortgage company with that money, I have NO ACCESS to my mother's money, I know NO ACCOUNTS #'s NOTHING everything that I do for my mother comes out of my paycheck, my sister does not even volunteer to do anything for my mother but spend her money, I have 2 brothers and they have no idea whats going as well, but I do, my mother is a retired R.N. has built a wonderful life for herself it sickens me that everything that she has worked for she is losing, I'm my mother's primary caregiver, my cousin has moved in with us to help me unload the pressure off of me, I have no children I'm single and have given up my whole entire life and moved back home care for her and, if I had to do it all over again I will not change anything. Please advise me in how do I go about doing this before my mother have nothing left, my mother is 69 years old and has built homes and traveld and retired nicely, and they way it's looking she won't have anything my sister is taking her money and spending it on her own lifestyle

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I would be calling the county elder abuse hotline and reporting the theft of elder funds. That's abuse and punishable in many states.
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I believe eyerishlass has given incorrect info. If the mom signs a Revocation of POA & has it notarized, then the former POA is null & void, immediately. Mom should also fill out a new POA at same time.
In Real Life, of course the Revocation might be signed at 10:00am, but the sister, the bank, and all the various entities won't know about the change, UNLESS your mom (or you) get copies of the Revocation, and the new POA, into their hands.
The old POA person might still have a pad of checks....they ought to return it to your mom.....but might not, so, your bank might need to change the account number. It can require some extra work to get it all straightened out.
Also keep in mind, most banks require the mom to come in, herself, with her Revocation, and the new POA documents, AND sign the bank's own "in-house" POA document s...so don't be surprised at this.
My mom just Changed her documents, and I had to do all of this (and haven't gotten the old checks back yet, so the account numbers had to be changed).
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Thank you I was saying to consult an attorney
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With your mom having dementia, obtaining POA at this point may not be possible. Talk to an elder law attorney and make sure you report your sister's abuse of your mom's money.

If and when you are able to get POA it won't cancel out your sister's POA. She'll still have POA unless she signs papers stating that she is withdrawing from being POA. If anything you and your sister will be co-POA's.

There is also an elder abuse hotline where you can report your sister's mismanagement of your mom's funds. This will bring the state into the mix but you may want to handle it privately through a lawyer if possible.
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