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She is 82, most things she can do, but she is unsteady on her feet and she gave up her license. I take her to appointments and things. She is a diabetic and has issues with it to the point where she has passed out.

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I’m not exactly sure what you’re asking. Do you mean being trained to be a caregiver? I’m not certain that there are any real classes for caregiving for a “private citizen”, if you will. All I’ve ever seen for that sort of thing are true Nursing Assistant Classes (STNA). Most of us fly by the seat of our pants as caregivers. I paid close attention when the aides would care for my husband when he was in a rehab facility. I would ask questions and ask to be shown. I watched YouTube videos. I learned by doing.

If you mean getting paid to be a caregiver, you will have to check the laws of your state. Google “getting paid to be a caregiver in _______. I can tell you that the compensation isn’t much.

Passing out and/or falling is not good if she lives alone. It’s unpredictable, happens in an instant and can have devastating consequences. Maybe she needs to go to her doctor and make sure her meds are all OK.

Hope this helps answer your questions.
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Since your profile says she lives in your home, why don't you consider yourself a caregiver now?

I suspect you mean a PAID caregiver. Does your mother pay anything for living in your home? If not, why not?
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I recommend assisted living if your mother can afford it. Or if you are willing to put your life on hold for years, you can move in with her or move her in with you and become her caregiver. If you decide to care for her yourself, read up on caregivers burnout so you know what to expect.
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