How to deal with short-term memory loss?

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My mom had a stroke about 4 months ago and has been in rehab/SNF ever since. Her left side was affected by the stroke. Her memory/cognitive abilities are just fine, except when it comes to absorbing her health and care needs. She remembers everyone, all the aides' names and family members, what my kids did yesterday or an hour ago, what she had for breakfast, dinner, etc. She is finally going home to 24/7 care on Friday. She is thrilled to be going home, but understandably freaked out that she (who has lived alone for 35 years) needs someone there all day and night. She KEEPS asking me to explain why she needs this level of care and I KEEP telling her it's because she can't get out of bed or wheelchair alone, etc. She'll call me back five minutes later to ask me again. And then 5 minutes after that. It's driving me crazy. I get annoyed and start yelling at her, which of course makes me feel guilty and terrible. What is the right thing to do here? Repeat it over and over? Block her calls? (I do that lately.)

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xinabess: Your mother's brain was dramatically affected by the stroke. She MAY be able to relearn skills depending upon her age, health, living conditions, if she eats clean and other factors.
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Xinabess, thanks for the update and good thoughts for going forward.....you rock!!
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Forgot this: Thank you for writing in. So often, while trying to "help," someone, it is I who learns. Best wishes!!
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Wow, it's like you know us!
Oh my! I would be so confused! My mom is different in some ways, and an exaggerated version of herself at other times. If I didn't get argument back, I would not know what to do! My mom and I are perfectionists. Now that she makes mistakes that are not her fault, I keep getting confused. I want to correct her and admonish her for her mistakes, as she would to me, but that doesn't make sense; and now she makes more mistakes. She does, however, still correct me, and is sometimes wrong, but no less harsh. I learned to be passive aggressive from her. Now that I'm trying to learn to be more assertive, I don't want to put up with that stuff anymore, but she was never going to change anyway, even long before. Being blamed for so much still stings. Additionally, I am a highly sensitive person (HSP) and our brains work differently. I like the insight, observation and prediction abilities it gives me, but it is not respected in western cultures, and adds to the difficulty.
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True, Joanne. It's so hard to break the usual mother-daughter dynamic where we irritate each other and argue frequently. Post-stroke, my formerly argumentative mother has become so sweet and compliant that it's unsettling. I feel guilty anytime I get annoyed with her, but, as we all know, caring for an elderly parent can drive you crazy. We have always been very close and loving, but there's also been a lot of strife and conflict. So this new dynamic is weird! and unfamiliar. She is thankful and sweet and I am too, to a point. I am used to pushback from her and without that, I am kind of confused.
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For me, what sometimes works with the repeated questions, etc.; is that if that person wasn't here I would do anything to hear or answer the same thing repeatedly a thousand times straight.
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Thanks for the update, xinabess!
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Well, drum roll .... my mom is home! What a day. She is thrilled to be back home (after 4 months), but being at home and being so dependent is harder than being at the SNF, since home is associated with her living on her own terms.

The Fri-Mon caregiver is lovely, very low-key. What a day of mishaps though. First, the aide sat on the IKEA bed I built for her and it broke!! I mean, she is large, but not massive. Poor thing was very embarrassed, as was I. Maybe I put it together wrong--oy. So I've ordered a box spring.

Later, I crawled under the hospital bed to plug in a lamp and my mom started lowering it!! I was almost crushed to death. Fortunately, I survived. Yeesh.

I stayed over (in an extra bed in my mom's room) and was happy that she slept soundly through the night. (I feel like I have a new baby.)

Now I am home and very glad to be here myself. Hoping all goes well. No call from anyone yet, so that's a good sign. At the SNF, my mom called me countless times per day.

Thanks for all the support! I hope to offer more to others as they go through this stuff.
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@Xinabess: Have you met the caregiver? (You said 'mysterious...') We lucked out with the caregivers for my dad. The one at home, he had time to get used to, and she was very sensitive about giving him time to get used to her invading the bathroom. The woman who ran the adult family home was exceptionally kind, especially after we'd met a three or four others and rejected the places for assorted reasons. She was also sensitive to Dad's embarrassment at needing women to look after him again in his 80s.

@ Babalou: Are you a fan of the Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, by any chance? (The "large friendly letters" made me laugh out loud!)
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xina, It seems that especially in the elderly we find they are unwilling to remember those things they find distasteful. Sometimes this works to your advantage, in time! DO NOT re-explain a situation that she is trying not to remember the "why" of!! (Subconcious or not) The large note and posters sound great and the encouragement and reinforcement of her progress is sure to be of help!! If you can keep her spirit at least on an even keel, then both of you will be happier. And remember that coming home will not be what she is expecting, regardless. It Just Won't Be.. It is up to her to make the best of it, to decide if she can be satisfied that so many people love and want to help her!! God Bless You!! I Pray all goes well!
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