How concerned should I be about MRSA?

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My brother was just diagnosed with MRSA in a recurring wound on his foot. Now we are concerned about bringing my mother to stay with my brother for a month in July. This was to be my respite - I missed my February respite because my brother had back surgery, now this. How concerned should we be about this? I don't want to put her in danger, but our trip up to Oregon is important for our mental health, too!

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Most people have MRSA in their nose and most health care workers have MRSA and should always wear gloves when dealing with a patient. MRSA has nothing to do with Aids. Hygiene is the best defense; washing hands often or wearing gloves is extremely important when taking care of an elderly relative. If a person has any foreign object in their body ie pacemaker, defibrillator, etc. MRSA can be extremely dangerous. My father got MRSA in his bloodstream and it went straight to his artificial heart valve and he died in two weeks. You don't have to be a fanatic about it, but use common sense and preventative measures.
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Everyone has MRSA on them. I believe it is an issue if you have aids or other immune system disease otherwise your natural immunity protects you. Everyone at the nursing home has "MRSA". When my dad goes to the hospital he is treated like a lepper but back at the nursing home all is the same. It is weird.
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My husband was diagnosed with MRSA after a swab test of his mouth. What is the difference between this and the other. While he was hospitalized, he was not given any medication for this, but we were told to wash our hands and some were told to wear a mask or scrubs. If anyone has an answer I would appreciate it.
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I have had three MRSA outbreaks since having gall bladder surgery four years ago. My doc told me that pretty much EVERYONE harbors the MRSA virus, and you have to be fanatical about washing your hands! When I care for my parents I swear I wash my hands at least 25 times a day, especially if I will be touching them or preparing food. Wash before you touch them, and after. Wash after using the bathroom. Use latex (or plastic) gloves if you need to bathe your parents or to care for a wound. Most people have some MRSA in their nostrils, so my doc gave me an antibiotic ointment that I swab in each nostril every night. I've used this for two years, have not had another MRSA outbreak, nor have I had a cold or the flu since I started using this stuff.
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My husband had MRSA and C-diff. No one in our household caught the MRSA, but our teenage daughter did catch the c-diff.
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Be very concerned!! My dad has developed MRSA three times, the last time, last June, he almost lost his leg to it. But. . .dad was living alone, has no feeling in his right foot or leg (he has diabetes but denies it.) By the time he was found in the house by a neighbor, the leg was black, he was delirious with pain. We believe he had a TIA during this time also. Got him to the ER, they gave him Vancomycin and got it under control (or so we thought.) Dad came to live with me after rehab, We were back in the hospital, September, October and November, same thing. The last time, they were very aggressive with the Vanco, I gave it to him intravenously for two weeks after discharge, twice a day. Gladimhere is right on, wash your hands before and after treating, wear gloves, keep EVERYTHING clean and dispose of used materials properly. Yes, once a person has contracted it, they are more prone to it. I check my dad's foot and leg every morning for wounds, scrapes, and make sure the skin is moisturized! Have a podiatrist trim the toe nails. I use Aquaphor by direction of the infectious disease specialist we ended up at. Even dry, flaky skin is an entry point for infection. Dry skin is very common in the elderly. That being said, go on your trip and enjoy your renewed mental health! With proper instruction, the family should be able to handle this. Consider a visiting nurse to help as well. Dad's IV was set up at the hospital, the meds were delivered to my house, a nurse came and instructed me how to do it. It really was easy, a portable "ball" that was gravity fed. That way, the patient can move around freely, it took about two hours or so for each ball. Hope this helps!
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Resistant bacteria are everywhere, there is no escape from it. I keep Mom's feet ultra clean, scrubbing off any callous or dead skin after a soak in Betadine Scrub. Throw out any nasty old slippers/ sneakers/bed socks. Clean what you can, throw out what you can't.
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I noted the comment on the wounds..depending
On what it is....diabetic, Bedsore, non closing
Surgical, ven statis etc.....the new theory
Is a bit different..if the drainage is that heavy
It will take a while. I would be tempted
To try a wound vac....I was not impressed
At first, but now think they are quite useful.
I've seen medihoney work when others
Fail.....worst comes to worst dakins sol...
Old but no resistance..
Cover with amd bandage.

Good luck
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Latest update. Apparently it is not MRSA after all, but something close to it. He is going to wound care doctor, and having wound debridement. He went through this a couple of years ago and knows what it takes to get rid of it. He had wound debridement on a weekly basis for a year. Bandage changing daily (that gets expensive - he learned that women's kotex is cheaper and works just as well).

My brother is single and lives alone. He is very clean, and when Mom comes to visit he is a great caregiver. I really can't sing his praises enough. He only has one bathroom, but his doctor and Mom's doctor both said (when they believed that Steve had MRSA) that spraying the tub with bleach after he got out of it would be sufficient to kill the germs. Now that the culture came back as something else, we can relax a bit.

Thanks you everyone for all the great advice. It seems I jumped the gun based on what the doctor told my brother (instead of waiting for the cultures to come in).
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I would buy a product called pHenominal. It's available for would care and drinking supplement. I used it on my mom's small wounds that developed after she had it in her eyes and urine. I did both for 2 years.

Cleaning everything is also a must! Use Clorox wipes...just to ensure things are not contaminated (bathrooms, door knobs, phone fridge handles etc).

Wash hands for 19 seconds (sing Happy Birthday 3 times) to rid your hands of any germs and wear disposable gloves when in contact with the wound.

It is HIGHLY contagious, but none of my family has it and my mom did for a long time before I found pHenominal. It's the only thing that worked - all the horrific antibiotic's and acids for her eyes. I used the treated water to rinse her eyes and it actually worked after months of the medical treatments did not.

Not trying to make you paranoid, but it is contagious. Just have them apart unless sitting in separate chairs - not together on a couch etc and keep those same seating arrangements. Opposite in the room is best if not separate. It is airborn when exposed. So - ensure she's NOT in the room when his bandages are changed.

DON'T share seats, towels, dishes, glasses, anything! Wash in a dishwasher, for your brother - use paper towels.

It is common, but not a good thing to have-)
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