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(grocery shopping for the elderly is a fu**king pain in the @ss, end rant). Howdy :) I wrote before how I'm the main caretaker of my 84 yr old grand dad with mild dementia. He lives by himself in a senior building, but its not an assisted living facility so he gets no help. (but they do provide the shuttle busses service to the grocery store, but he refuses to use it because he has the patience of a fly,and will bark, yell & complain). Like I'm sure many of you experience, grocery shopping as a caretaker is a total pain in the @ss. Crazy as this sounds, granddad still drives himself to the grocery store, with a neighbor in the car for safety (he shouldnt, I know). But shopping with him is a nightmare, so I'm glad I dont have to go most times. I just pray he makes it home safe. But he's getting too old & weak to go shopping. But 80% of the time he doesnt need the bull he thinks he so desperately needs, so its annoying. I just hired a home health aide but I'm unsure if she even has a drivers license (she works 3 days a week). Granddad acts like a spoiled toddler and constantly insists he needs 1000 things from the store all the time, but I hate taking him shopping because he's too slow & complains,complains, complains. He complains about where I park, complains that we didnt go early enough, etc...Also, although I drive very well and I'd be happy to go by myself, he actually complains when I drive myself to get his groceries (in his car, my car broke down). Instread of being thankful that someone is doing him a favor, he acts like an ungrateful jerk. So I no longer want to take him shopping, or go by myself because he acts like such an as^ about it. I dont know if the aide has her license (I forgot to ask her before I hired her). I could send her to the store by herself I guess.There's a neighbor I could pay about $50 a month to go, but I'm unsure what to do. How do you all handle the shopping??, and how do you handle your loved one when they make endless demands for stupid items they probably dont even need???)

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FregFlyer: Lol!! :)

and thanks for the welcome. And a blanket fort sounds nice.

Ya know, I think probably most of us caretakers are all the "good ones/good kids/nice guys" who strangely got stuck with obnoxious (sometimes impossible) parents/grandparents/aunts/uncles :)

RainMom: sorry about your Mom. Wow. Thank you so much for sharing with me!
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Morena7, yes, welcome to the forums. Anytime you see someone write that they need to put their helmet on, please note the helmet is invisible, it comes in handy if you want to bang your head against the wall.

It's been suggested if you are in too much stress, build yourself a blanket fort in your livingroom, and bring out the coloring books. I noticed that Sheldon, on the Big Bang Theory, enjoyed his blanket fort :)

Sometimes someone will mention "leaning their ears back". Just visualize an animal who is upset with their ears facing backwards and their teeth showing in a growl. How many times we all have felt like doing that.

Sounds like you need a helmet when you take Grand-Dad shopping !!
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Actually, my mom passed away about two months ago. I loved mom and had a lot of respect for the person she was prior to dementia but - I'm no hypocrite- my mom had been a stubborn, self centered manipulater all my life and most likely, all hers. Dementia made it 100x worse - until I finally got her to see a geriatric psychiatrist who got mom on some proper medications- her last 8 months were better. But yes, to your question. Mom would call me constantly accusing me of never seeing her when I was visiting her twice a week. Once, when the caregiver came back after a two week vacation she told me my mom was sad because I hadn't visited or seen to any of her care needs the entire two weeks - and yes, I had made sure mom had a substitute caregiver the whole time - in addition to my visits. When I found this site I had been looking after my mom for five years and I was physically, emotionally and mentally close to a complete breakdown myself! Morena- it's good you've found this site early on in your trip down the rabbit hole after your grandfather- this site and the wonderful people who post here will prove invaluable to you.
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RainMom, believe me I LOVE the venting stories! Thank you :) I'm new to this website and its a godsend, because, I feel like we're part of some underground Secret Club going through these crazy things that no one else understands :) Your Mom and my GrandDad are VERY similar. And like I said, yeah, I know we have to accept their brain is "broken" but its amazing how their Brain isn't broken when it comes to getting what they want (yeah that was sarcasm). Well, I'll be honest, your story made my blood boil just a little bit. On one hand, your mom's brain is "broken", so someone would think "well, maybe the poor lady just forgot that she has to tell her daughter beforehand that she wants the library". On the other hand, her brain wasn't so "broken" that she couldnt remember to bring her book bag and open it at the exact moment she needed to!!". Grrrrrr! THAT'S the part of us that ALL of us deal with!! I've called my granddad a "jerk" on this website, so I'll guess I'll just ask for forgiveness from you-- when I say that Your Mom sounds a little "Manipulative" in my humble opinion. And I'm so sorry that you also have a disabled child (well, I shouldnt say sorry, because I'm sure you love him as he is). Actually I used to help care for my teenage Autistic step brother, so I can relate A LITTLE to you juggling him at the store. My bro is "ok" at the store, but one time he wandered off went missing for 20 seconds (He was standing 2 inches from me, I turned my head to pay the casheir, and he was gone!!!), I FREAKED out, got hysterical, and a lady helped me find him.. SO yeah, there's NOOOO way in hell you can bring your son AND your Mom on outings together, just no way.

Yeah, I TOTALLY relate to why that was The Day you hired an Aide. I also hired an Aide a few weeks after granddads Walmart Meltdown, but mainly after realizing that going to visit him weekly was actually making me depressed (and anxious). I would literally feel depressed as I was walking out the door to go visit him. And I'd feel anxious & nervous because I'd never know if he'd be in a good mood,or scream at me for something petty.... Anyway, your Mom was manipulative with the Depends. Its like, she "understood" what not having them would mean, because she knew she'd have to use napkins/rags, so clearly she has decent reasoning ability (at times I guess). And yeah, like I say, their entitlement over wanting extra special treatment is just awful. I 100% support you getting an Aide for her.

SO RainMom let me ASK you (heck, I might as well), Now that you have an Aide for her, is she doing the whole "where are you? why didnt you visit me this week?": thing. My Aide is brand new (its only been 3 weeks), But the Aide called me, sounding all sad, saying "He misses you, he keeps asking for you". Like, he actually has HER feeling SORRY for HIM!! & has her thinking that I'M the distant grandchild who doesnt visit or help him! Are you KIDDING Me!!?? I was his personal slave for over a year!. No, I will NOT be visiting you that much any more since she's here to pull some weight, sorry. I need a break.
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Morena - lol! Ah yes, the epic tantrum. One more - last one, I promise - but it feels so good to vent to someone who really gets it! This one combines the library AND the grocery store. So, I've told my mom 1000 times if she wants me to drive her somewhere on my visits she has to tell me at least the day ahead as I had to get someone to watch my disabled son - it had become impossible for me to take them out together. I get to her place, we get in the car to go to the grocery store. As I'm pulling out, my mom removes her folded cloth book bag from her purse and tells me she wants to go to the library before we go grocery shopping. I tell her I don't have the sitter long enough to do both. Mom gets pouty and say the library called that morning and her books are ready. I repeat that we can't do both that day and tell her to pick one - groceries or library. Mom sets her mouth to The Look and says library. Then she adds that she's out of Depends. I attempt reasoning, saying then we have to do the groceries and we'll do the library in a few days. More of The Look and the pout and mom says No. She wants to go to the library and that she'll just stuff rags in her pants! Recognizing this for the manipulation it was, I say "fine, stuff rags in your pants"! We drive in silence to the library. On the way home I knew I couldn't let her go without Depends so I pull into the grocery store lot. Mom gets all perky. Now, I have about 20 minutes to drop mom off and get home in time for the sitter to leave - it's a 15 minute drive home... I turned to my mom and said "I'm running in to get your Depends. Don't you dare move from this car. If you are not here when I get back, I will leave you and you can find your own way home". It was one of the few times I ever really lost it with my mom. That was the day I called a caregiver agency. That was also the day I began buying my moms Depends myself - at Costco in the ever convenient industrial size box!
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GardenArtist I'll have to call his Car Insurance. I hope they dont charge extra for that, thanks

ZYTrhr: Yeah, the shuttle would be a LAST resort, he has NO patience and I'm 90% sure he'd verbally abuse the Bus Driver, sream & yell at him for simpply doing his job. My GrandDad thinks that waiting 5 minutes is waiting 5 hours, he explodes and goes into tirades if he has to "wait". Honestly I even feel bad forcing the Aide to get on the Shuttle Bus with him; his constant Complaining & Waiting would be a form of torture for her. I actaully want my Aide to be treated nicely and I told her to INFORM me if he EVER treats her rudely, it will NOT be tolerated; I rarely raise my voice but I will definitely give him an ear-full if he dares to be rude to her. But luckily she's kinda attractive so he's being NICE & Flirty to her beause his old "ladies man" mannerisms are kickin in when she comes around (Oy!)
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RainMom: I TOTALLY relate to the "MY Library/MY Store" thing! Well the image of your mom in the walker with tons of traffic, busy street thing, cars behind you honking, ugh! But It was soooo nice you tried to take her to the (closer) library, that actually sounds like it could have been a very cool, fun outing-- quick to get there, not TOO much of a hassle, great she had the mindset to still order books & read, plus you could be doing 'your own thing' on your cell phone. (Actually if my granddad had an easy hobby like that, I'd probably take him once every 8 weeks). But yeah, once again the 'spoiled toddler' thing kicks in & had to ruin it (-_-) It's like, one common theme I notice is their lack of consideration for others; and I honestly dont know if thats the demenia, or just their real personality. I'm sure the closer library was NICE too. 20 minutes is a LONG drive in my opinion, no way.... But, doesnt it just kill you how they love to play "the victim" and act like you're treating them sooo horribly just because you dont give them the Royal Treatmen? Its like they expect to be treated like Queen Elizabeth and King Henry. DID YOU CONTINUE TAKING HER TO THE OLD LIBRARY? Oh, her not signing up for the Book Delivery thing, it was honestly just her way of pouting.She KNEW it was a cool thing, but because she wanted that Queen Elizabeth treatement. Also, The SAME THING happened me & GrandDad!! The REASON I posted this question is because we had a major blow up last month: He asked me to take him shopping; I proceed to drive him Walmart literally 8 minute drive away, he DEMANDS that I take him a Different Walmart--but thats thats 25 minutes away!! we literally have to get on the HIGHWAY to get there! WHY?because he's been driving himself there for 10 years. I told him callmly "No, its here or home". He says "take Me home!!". Fine, I drive him home.... BUT they love to play the VICTIM afterwards, cry, & tell the family how "hard" things are, how they need "help"; never mentioning how they REFUSE people's offers for help! (*insert that Vincent Van Gogh Screaming Painting here**)

I KNOW his brain is "broken", but I guess the strange position we're in is: they're like 50-60-70% mentally able to understand/talk/engage/respond, so you feel like you're dealing with a normal person, but that extra 30% thats 'broken" kicks in.
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Fregflyer

You're lucky. Peapod is not offered in the Cleveland area yet. Giant Eagle Curbside and one other store are the only only grocery shopping games in town.
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FregFlyer: Oh my god, there's no way I'd have the energy to buy my own groceries while taking him shopping. You're better than me. The only thing I want to do is get the hell out of there as f aast as possible. One time granddad was all finished shopping, and I only needed ONE thing, but because it was in the NEXT aisle, and I knew he'd walk too slow & Complain: I said to myself "hell no, we're getting out of here", and we went to the checkout counter.... Ok googled On-Line Shopping/PeaPod Service. I see they have a $60 minimum and it costs $10. Hmm, I dont know. If I can get the Aide to go, that would be better. (But I think thats a great price though. and I'll look into the UTI infection)

JESSIEBELL lol at the smails on rice and her getting Mad about it!! (+_+)
And the "10 of Everything" thing is where we're at too. Grr
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zytrhr, the Peapod on-line service I use, they will accept all coupons. Then you will see on your credit card statement the coupon deductions.

Peapod will have specials once in awhile while you can get free curbside pickup [usually in my area the cost is $2.95] or free home delivery [depends on how much one orders the delivery cost]. Peapod will once in awhile offer a list of free items to try out, you pick one item.

Peapod has pretty much everything offered in the local grocery store they partnered with.... thus a pretty large website... but one can narrow it down to your own shopping list of regular items to help speed up the "shopping". Each item is described plus all the labels on the product are posted, so you can see how much salt is in the product. One can also searched for "low salt" items, and other diet restriction items.
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Morena7

I can almost understand his apprehension about the shuttle. He could finish his trip before it would come back, hence he would be waiting, could be for a long time.
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Online grocery shopping can be expensive, unless maybe ones that offer curbside. What if there are coupons for the food, how are they redeemed?
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FreqFlyer - I tried that too, doing my grocery shopping at the same time - just to keep busy and try to lessen my annoyance. But yeah, I'd finish an entire cart and mom would be on isle 3. So I'd say, "here, let me see your list and I'll go get some of your items". Oh no! Couldn't possibly do that! Mom insisted on going up and down every freakin' isle "just in case" she'd see something she forgot to put on her list. Perhaps another box of Triscuts to add to the four boxes she already had at home?
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I was in the grocery store when an aid was helping an older man shop. She was "irritated" she had to do this.
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Morena, a word of caution: if an aide drives your GF's car, you should contact your father's insurance agent and let her/him know so that this person can be added as a covered driver in the event there's an accident.
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Morena - just for fun, I'm gonna tell you about The Library! My mom was a voracious reader and mom being a thrifty woman - she would get what ever books she wanted by ordering them through the library. Once moms drivers license was gone I also got the joy of taking mom to the library once a week - often she wanted to go a couple times a week but I put my foot down. But here's the thing - mom didn't just want to go to the library - she wanted to go to HER library. Moms library was in our old neighborhood- a good twenty minute, one way - drive from her apartment. Our old neighborhood had become trendy and popular - never anywhere to park so getting mom in and out was a mini ordeal - double parking, emergency flashers, people in their cars yelling at me as I unloaded mom, her walker, the ever present purse, book bag, walked to the front door with her - held the door for her...you get the picture. I tried to get mom to go to the library near her apartment - five minutes away, huge parking lot... but NOooo! It had to be HER library. Some may say "she was familiar with her old library" etc, but she never perused the shelves - she ordered the books on line and picked them up at the Will-Call desk. But it gets better - I find out a big "book mobile" goes to my moms IL once a month AND joy of joys - you can order books AND they'll bring them to your apartment door!!! All you had to do was fill out a simple form. So, I get a bunch of these forms, the calendar of when the book-mobile comes and happy dance to my moms apartment. Mom gets all pissy, gets that look to her face - the one with her mouth and jaw set just so - and that was the end of it. Until - and here's the kicker - about a year later I see one of the forms filled out on moms desk - I say "I see you've decided to try this after all" to which mom says "oh yes! It's something your Aunt Betty told me about! I wish
I'd known about it months ago!" At which point I drove home and began looking for my gun.
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I don't try to take my mother grocery shopping anymore. She is very slow and can't see very well. She also has no impulse control, so would get things off the shelf that we didn't need or wouldn't use. I would tell her we already had 10 of something, but that would make her mad. I would tell her that we don't eat snails on rice, but that would make her mad. It was a complete struggle and we would end up with a huge bill in order to avoid a huge fight. So I shop alone now. I drop by the grocery store 2-3 times a week to make the trips an outing more than a chore. I live with my mother, so the outing can be welcome. I keep a running list of things needed on the refrigerator. That makes shopping easier.
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Morena7, not to go off subject here, but I wonder if your Grand-Dad has a urinary tract infection [UTI] that can cause elders to misbehave, anxiety, say rude things, etc. This type of infection can easily be cleared up. It's worth asking whomever takes your Grand-Dad to the doctor to do that.

And if it isn't a UTI, maybe the doctor can prescribed Grand-Dad something to take the edge off. That is, if Grand-Dad will take his medicine.
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Morena7, to add to my post, I disliked grocery shopping, too. I would take my parents, I would get the items I needed, usually a full cart... and my parents would be getting what they needed. The only problem was I was in Aisle 26 while my parents were still in Aisle 5, with 21 more Aisle to go :P

Then I would need to put their groceries and my groceries into the trunk of their car, that wasn't easy, as I was in my 60's but my parents still viewed me as being in my 30's. Then I would unload their groceries and help Mom put away the items. Remember this was a full cart full. Then I would need to take my bags from their truck and put them into my vehicle, and unload those at my house. No wonder I needed a nap after each grocery trip !! I did this each week for a few years until I discovered on-line groceries.
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BabaLou, its amazing how a trip to Bed Bath & Beyond can become an exhausting ordeal. That store is actually a cool fun place, but I guess its a nightmare when you become her personal shopper/assistant. Plus people dont realize the whole act of getting into the car, parking, walking in the lot, bathroom breaks, reaching for items, finding items they want, ugh.(also you're doing more errands that me, wow)

WINDYRIDGE: Yes, I can no longer keep subjecting myself to this. Now that I hired an Aide, I'm trying to organize & sort out just how we';ll handle shopping. IF she has a license I'm just going to let her drive granddads car (she doesnt have a car). I hope she does, cause I REALLY like this Lady, she's one of the FEW people Granddad likes. (he treats her MUCH NICER than he treats me, which is fine, it makes my life 10 times easier).

FREGFLYER your trips sound almost worse than mine, I couldnyt imagine losing 2 parents in the store. Yes I see what you mean about the 'loss of independance' and why it makes them grumpy. Grr. ...Anyway I felt a chill when you said he soon wont be able to drive. Yeah, I need to organize this whole grocery shopping thing with the Aide.

GARDEN ARTIST : Yeah I actually agree with doing some shopping for him. I actually do know some of his Main Staples and I used to pick them them up in my spare time every few weeks & bring it to him. But thanks, beause you're right that I need to look in his fridge & cabinets to see a few additional staples, cause I notice he likes lots of milk & bread.
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RainMom: Oh my God, you totally get it. See, the whole "grocery shopping" thing is one of those "issues" that can seem so petty, but it's actually a HUGE deal. Yes, a trip to the store 2 miles away can become a 3 hour trip to HELL!! Exactly! Of ALL the duties I do, grocery shopping is literally the Number 1 Most Hated duty. The ONLY duty that would be worse would of course be bathing/changing. I thank GOD Granddad can still do his own personal grooming (if not I'd put him in a Nursing Home). But yes, its a trip to hell & nightmare. I actually called his oldest Daughter who literally lives 15 minutes away from him if she would PLEASE take him just shopping ONCE a Month, since she literally does ZERO to help him, so this would be the very least she could do. She said "no" and said its because grandad is too rude...Well I'll talk to the aide tomorrow and ask her if she has a license. Fingers crossed

MsMadge: I totally relate to when your mom panicked while you went shopping. Thats one of the BIG problems I have, when I DO go shopping for him by myself, instead of just watching TV like he always does, he literally becomes HYSTERICAL, calling my cell phone, demanding I "hurry up", at times screamin & cussing at me when I arrive beause I "took too long".
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Morena, it's time to "put your foot down", and with it firmly planted on the floor.

First, make a list of what he typically buys; you should be familiar with the staples, so include them, as well as some things that he throws in as spur of the moment purchases. If the staples are on sale that week, add some to stock up, especially since winter is coming.

Remember that he probably can't think to organize such a list himself, nor would he. So take that process away from him. Writing a number for the amount of an item he wants if easier than thinking out what he needs.

Second, set rules, and stick to them. He can fill out the form by checking the item. You'll get that, but nothing more once you go to the store, ALONE. If he starts yelling, tell him you won't tolerate such rude behavior and hang up. And stick to it.

Even if he can't think clearly b/c of the dementia, you don't have to tolerate verbal abuse.

Third, perhaps buy him a few treats that he likes but didn't request. And, if over time, he behaves and complies, perhaps take him out once a month for his special trip, but don't let it become a habit again as it is now.

Fourth, when he asks for something in between grocery store trips, tell him, FIRMLY: "SORRY, but I only go once a week. Put if on next week's list". End of discussion.

Fifth, meds are a different story. Add them to your calendar, date of purchase, number of pills, and project out to a few weeks before the next refill is due. Then call in the refill, get it yourself and bring it to him.

Of the "I need it now" purchases, the meds are really the most important.
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Morena7, I had time like what you wrote regarding my parents once they stopped driving, it was 7 years of driving all over hill and dale.

But one needs to stand in Grand-Dad's shoes for a moment. Imagine if you were no longer able to drive. You couldn't hop into your car at a moment's notice to run to the store. It's a terrible lost of independence for an elder. You would be grumpy, too. I realize your Grand-Dad still can drive, but that is going to fade away pretty soon.

Anytime I took my parents [who were in their 90's] to Target or to Wal-Mart, you'd think I was taking them to Disney World. They would spend a lot of time in the store, Mom would take her cart in one direction, and Dad would take his cart in another direction. I rarely bought anything for myself because I was helping reaching things for Mom that were on the top shelf or bottom shelf.....

Then came time to ring-out. But first I had to go look for Dad. I would place Mom on a store bench to wait while I looked for him, which meant numerous trips around the store. Ah, there he is, so I would bring him back to where I had left Mom. Ok, where is Mom? Apparently she got worried and went looking for Dad, too [oh great, Mom is legally blind]. So the search for one's parents is now in Part II, and sometimes Part III and Part IV.

Oh the exhaustion. Then Dad would say, lets go to Home Depot. Noooooo.

On-line grocery shopping was a Godsend for me. See if your area has Peapod. Or check the grocery ads, the store will advertise if they have such a service. There is curbside pickup and home delivery.
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When toddlers act up in the store you leave them home. Quit subjecting yourself to this ordeal. When I visit my elderly folks I take a look, see what they need and do a major shopping trip. Dad, with dementia, can still do small trips but he has a hard time finding anything but the most basic stuff. Home care services will also do the shopping for elders. I have a company on deck for when my Dad can no longer drive. It's about $20 per hour. I'm long distance so it will be an important service for us.

When that time comes I won't be able to get them to agree, I'll just have to set it in motion. Luckily I have control of the money so I can make it happen.

You may have a more pressing problem in ending grandpas driving. That's a whole nother battle......
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my dad was like that, all kinds of transportation available and he refused - and also had a short fuse.
May I suggest online grocery delivery?
I used to grocery shop for mom, dad, and myself and it was Exhausting to say the least. I had to stop taking mom because she would stare at a soup can forever, I took dad once and he was SO rude.
I took him to the diner once a week which he looked forward to getting out and going for a ride.
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For my mom (who no longer needed to grocery shop) it was Bed Bath and Beyond. It was an outing for her. Shopping had ALWAYS been her stress reliever, even when we were little kids, so I treated it as such.

I never went to BBB with mom even THINKING about doing any of my own shopping there. I focused totally on her, what she was looking for and the like. It was exhausting. It was only once every two or three weeks (the other weeks we did haircut, going to the dry cleaners and other "errands" that yes, the facility could have taken her to. But she liked to do these things "privately".

If you are going to do the "helping out" thing, read about dementia and watch Teepa Snow videos. Understand about the fact that he brain is BROKEN and that it takes perhaps an infinite amount of patience to accompany a demented elder shopping.

Also, set some boundaries on his behavior. "Grandad; I have a new rule. No complaining while we're out shopping. Let's make this a pleasant time for the two of us to be together". "Ooops, no complaining Grandad!". Give it a try
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Going to the grocery store is an outing for the elderly
Pushing a shopping cart is easier than using a walker
I used to take mom with me to the grocery store on Sunday evenings
She would usually have to pee a couple of times while there - I'd always say meet me in the produce section - she never did
I'd either be looking up and down one aisle or another for her or she'd wander outside looking for me or worst have me paged by a cashier like a lost child

Her last night at home I ran to the store for 30 minutes - she got scared and went outside and fell in the neighbors driveway

Caregiving especially for someone with dementia requires time and patience -
See if you can work together on a weekly list before going to the store - can you get some of the items without him going along?
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Morena - I totally understand. There was a period of a couple of months after my mom lost her drivers license but before she had a hired caregiver when I had to take my mom grocery shopping- it was enough to make me want to blow my head off! My mother was mad as hell over losing her drivers license and took it out on me whenever possible. I swear to God, she purposely made going to the store as miserable as possible as punishment for me. Mom would turn going to the store - 2 miles from her apartment - a three hour trip to hell. I'll spare you all the gory details but the end result was me hiring a part-time caregiver. And believe me - it was a requirement that they be willing and able to take mom on her errands and shopping. No license or car = no job. If the woman you hired can't/won't take your grandpa shopping, I'd suggest you start interviewing again.
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Thank you jeannegibbs.

You're right. I dont always look at him as someone with a damaged brain.

And yes the anaology of a spoiled toddler is correct. I was thinking that I'll need to have a "talk" with him and tell him that alot of these 'store visits' have to end. It's ridiculous.
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Morena7, your granddad has dementia, right? You really cannot expect normal, rational behavior from him. In caregiving someone with dementia you either 1) accept the realities of their damaged brain 2) bow out of the caregiving or 3) lose your own sanity.

Personally, I recommend option 1, but it takes time and patience to learn.

How would you handle a spoiled toddler who insists he needs thousands of things? Again, it is a matter of recognizing that granddad has a damaged brain and in some ways can't be expected to make his own buying decisions any better than a toddler could.

Have you considered stores that deliver? Sure cuts down on impulse buying!
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