cmwracerx Asked September 2009

How can we stop the drooling from Parkinsons?

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Does anyone have any suggestions for alleviating the drooling associated with Parkinsons? My father has tried chewing gum for this, and even had botox shots in his salivary glands, and this didn't work. Any input would be greatly appreciated!

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Singingway Jun 2015
Daily neck exercises and (thorough/lengthy) massage of neck,upper back, top of shoulders, jaw, teeth and gums. Often the tongue and swallow muscles are not coordinating because one or more muscle is pulling so tightly it locks up the others. When they thought my mother (with PD) had lost the ability to swallow, I massaged the sides of her neck, and suddenly the swallow muscles in the front of her neck could work again. Massage until warm and tingly. Do only one side of neck at a time. Use sesame oil or sunflower oil. Warmth helps too.
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Georgia44 Jun 2015
I would like to know if everyone is taking care of their spouse at home with Parkinsons or are they in a hospital/nursing home?
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Irenembl Jun 2015
Find a local Feldenkrais practitioner who can help with building sensation in the tongue and mouth as well as the posture needed to keep your head up. As you learn to sit and stand in a more supported way, it's easier to swallow your saliva (and food too). feldenkrais website, and type in your zip code to find a provider.
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thw1953 Sep 2014
I use double bubble gum for my husband with his drooling with the Parkinson's. It seem to help a lot. You can buy it at Dollar General, Wal-Mart, grocery store, etc. Just ask someone at the store and they can tell you if they have it or not. He has had other stuff done but has not helped. Good Luck.
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• If you tend to drool, you probably don’t have more saliva than you used to have; you are just not swallowing it as automatically as before.

• Frequent sips of water or sucking on ice chips during the day can help you swallow more often.

• Always keep your head up, with your chin parallel to the floor, and your lips closed when you are not talking or eating.

• Reduce your sugar intake, as it tends to make more saliva in the mouth.

• You might also consider having Myobloc (Botulinum toxin B) injections into the parotid gland—the biggest saliva-producing gland. The parotid gland is right near your ear and the injections last 3-4 months.

• Anticholinergic medications can be used to help control drooling. However, because of the side effects the preferred method is the Myobloc injection.
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dotti62 Apr 2012
SLP makes the most sense. I have put this in motion with my P. person. Tried having him suck on hard candy yesterday (1/2 day) and it did improve greatly. Don't Know for sure if it was coincidence or really worked since such a short time.
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cece Apr 2012
Is Botox approved for Parkinson's? It's expensive and takes injections in the face.
A lot of older people have very thin skin, there can be allergic reactions too. Also infections.
I have never checked on that one. With cash anything is possible.
I wouldn't give it to a parent. An antihistamine could help, along with fluids.
Good question.
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fairygirl Apr 2012
Botox
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cece Apr 2012
Keep water with a straw all of the time. If you drink all of the time you are able to swallow all of the time; it hides the drooling too.
Keep it by their bed at night too. Also, crushed ice partially melted tastes really good.
Don't try anything that can cause chocking. Fluids are enough.
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I recently attended a PD support group and the neurologist that runs it has had all of her drooling patients suck on lollipops. She said it worked for all of them.
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