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My mom is in the hospital and needs a skilled nursing center. The social worker is less than helpful but nursing homes won't work with us directly. How can we find another social worker than the one assigned by the hospital?

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Well said, FF!

In response to some others who've had bad experiences with Social Workers, there are times that their hands are tied by rules and regs. They can't talk to you because there is no HIPAA release. There is only one bed in the county. The patient's medical record doesn't qualify the patient for NH care.

"How can we make this better for my mom?" " is there something that I'm missing here?". Sometimes showing yourself willing to listen makes a difference, not always, to be sure.

There should be a patient advocate who is independent from the regular social workers at the hospital .
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lmcglawn, there are times when there is only one open bed and the facility is miles down the road. If there is anyway you can have the doctor delay release, maybe another bed will open up in a facility closer in.

Please note even using a dozen different Social Workers, if there is only one bed available, that's it, one bed. Now, the patient could go to that bed, and the Social Worker can find space available couple days later at another place, you can transfer that patient to the new facility... but you pay out of pocket for that transport bill.
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Careisgiving is right on the money! Sadly, we have to do most of the legwork for any kind of long term care. Our "social worker" for my husband's liver transplant was a doe eyed baby. Literally, she had no CLUE what she was doing or what to do to help. I needed so much guidance and she just kept handing me pamphlets, and saying "I know this is hard". I gave up and got on the internet, drove the drs crazy with questions and figured it out by myself. Made a ton of mistakes, but no patient is a one size fits all with one treatment plan that always works. And yes, I had to get way outside my comfort zone and be flat out tough and not back down sometimes to get answers and to get my husband the care he needed. Good luck!!
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If you wish to see a window into the nature of the academic preparation demanded of social workers I recommend review of the degree curricula at any public university. It will open your eyes and dispel any positive notion you may have about ANY social worker. So sorry if this offends but the bulk of their academic preparation is crazy cultural Marxist theories. Anyone who buys into them is not fit for serious decision making affecting our loved ones.
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First - Get in the face of the patient advocacy and tell them you want a new social worker. Period. No excuses. Second - ask for a list of SNFs (Skilled Nursing Facilities). Get on Google and type the word "review" and read like mad all the reviews. Then go tour the facility. After the discharge order has been written up - you have very little time to find a place - because insurance won't pay after a few days from the discharge orders; hospitals want their money from the insurance company and want their patients out NOW. You'll have to do the leg work to find a good place. For future reference with regards to your mother's care, see if her primary care physician works with home health agencies. If so, this may be a good option for her. She can get in-home rehab care while her doctor is following her. If your mother is ever to become homebound due to a medical condition, Google doctors who come to the home. With the rise in the aging population, there are doctors who now service the elderly directly in their home and will offer rehab through home health in the comfort of her/your home. My mother is homebound and we have a doctor who comes to our home - and he takes Medicare. If you haven't been through the SNF system - it's a real eye-opener. Some are good - but some are so, so bad - like really bad! You need to have back-up plan NOW for any future hospitalization. With SNFs, it's all about bed availability and hospitals don't give a sh*t if the place has a bad reputation - they want her out ASAP. Don't trust the "discharge team" to find a good place for your Mom - you'll have to do it. I'm not trying to scare you, it's just that I've been through the healthcare system for a decade now while caring for both parents, and now just caring for my mother. Let's just say, I was very, very naive to the whole system and through multiple and painful set-backs, I learned the hard way how the system worked and what I needed to do to get things done. I don't let any hospital staff or doctor push me into doing something I don't want to do. You need to firmly and politely stand your ground and arm yourself with resources. You don't need to yell, don't need to scream - just let the staff know you mean business. I'm a woman - and I grew a pair of big balls in the process of taking care of my parents. You are your mother's case manager.
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Sorry to learn you've having so many problems. I eventually short circuited the hospital discharge plannesr and rehab facility social workers and made my own contacts after checking the Medicare site Glad references. I made checklists of nursing homes, called, toured, created a short list, then decided which I wanted.

I did have trouble with social workers at the rehab facilities; twice one of them made home care arrangements with what I suspect was a preferred agency (or maybe a subsidiary of their parent corporation) despite having been told by me that we wanted a specific agency.

When she pretended that I had agreed to her preferred agency, I stood my ground and made it clear I never had and in fact had advised which home care group I wanted.

Don't worry about being firm; it's your choice, not their's. And in fact one of the hospital discharge planners more or less recommended one that had a bad reputation then backed off when I told her it was considered a place that people never came out of - sort of like the facility of no return.
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Check out Medicare nursing home compare:
https://www.medicare.gov/nursinghomecompare/search.html

Unfortunately hospital social workers are overworked, and limited to facilities that have beds available.
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You need a geriatric care manager. They have a website that will list names of those certified in your area. In my area they charge about $100.00 an hour. But, money well spent if you want someone to help you find appropriate care in a place with a good reputation. I do not think hospital social workers ever see these places. We made the mitake of trusting a hospial SW, did not know any better at that time. The first nursing home the SW referred us to lasted three days. There were much nicer, brighter places out there.
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Would the patient advocate be different than the social worker? In the entire area she has only provided one available home and it is 20 miles away and very low ratings.
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I soooooo relate. I have almost had fist fights with some of those social workers -- they must be under a lot of pressure on their job but, whoa, they can be hostile....

Usually, I find that venting somewhere else and calming down helps me, then if I can speak quietly with the social worker and hopefully not swear at her, things might go better. Sometimes I mention to a doctor or nurse that I need help with a social worker, and ask them for suggestion....

If, however, there is someone I just can't work with and I have to deal with her directly, I just say in a VERY NICE way. "This just isn't working for me. Is there another social worker who can take my case" and if that doesn't work, then, again, nicely, "I'd like to talk to the supervisor, please."

I basically try to make a choice whether or not I want to have a fight and not do so compulsively, because that usually doesn't get me the results I want. If I want to have a fight, I will tell the supervisor in a calm voice why I need a new social worker and what the other one did that was unacceptable. If I don't want to get into it, but just want to get on to the skilled nursing center, then I just say, "I'm sorry, I am not able to work with her." and try to leave it at that.

Assertiveness is definitely a learned skill, and it's not something most women are taught in their growing up years. Be kind to yourself and love yourself for trying, even if things feel uncomfortable!!
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Get in touch with the patient advocate at the hospital . What is the the discharge depot at the hospital telling you?
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