How can my Mother live in assisted living when she can't afford it?

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My Mother is now an amputee (one leg). She was completely independent before the amputation. All adult children live in other cities and lead lifestyles of traveling for work. She needs assisted living, but can't afford it for very long. Is her only option, once financially broke, to live in a long term nursing home on Medicaid?

There is a retirement community where she could afford the monthly fee, but the entrance fee is out of reach. Is there some way to get money for the entrance fee from a grant?

Also, she doesn't own her home, it is mortgaged.. and I haven't read anything about how this plays into Medicaid eligibility and assets.

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What were your mom's long term plans, would she be willing to relocate closer to family? Even family that travels for work would be more support than no family at all.
It is so unfortunate that these crisis situations catch everyone flat footed and leave you scrambling for solutions that would really benefit from more time and forethought. If she doesn't progress well with her rehab then I think a nursing home will be the best place for her, but try to find one that has more mentally aware seniors and activities to keep them that way.
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Thanks JessBelle. Presently, she can't transfer herself in or out of the wheel chair. She is incontinent and healing a wound at the incision site. She is going to a SNHF next week for more healing and PT. I know that having only one leg is very livable, but she's 83 and I just haven't seen fire in her yet. I don't think her being home alone, without motivation, socialization, and/or inspiration would be good. I'm trying to stay open. Louisana doesn't have many communities to choose from- much less subsidized pricing : (

Medicaid should pay for assisted living too.
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I forgot to mention the house. If she won't be able to live there and no heirs are interested in it, it would be a good time to let it go. I don't know how much equity she has in the home, but if it is a good bit, it can help pay for her care.
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lamama, many amputees are still able to live independent lives. Perhaps you can locate an retirement community that is wheelchair friendly. It may be that with a little initial help, your mother would do fine. We lived in a retirement community in TX where many of the residents were in wheelchairs. The sidewalks and apartments were made to accommodate them and the rents were reasonable. Many of the residents in the 1-BR apartments were subsidized by the state, so their rents were more affordable. Something like this may be good for your mother. I would recommend that she have some initial help in her new place and that someone come in to help her clean the house and herself once or twice a week.
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