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My mom has moderate Alzheimer's disease, she cannot see well because of her glaucoma (a decision she made years ago has caused her glaucoma to make her blind in one eye) and doesn't hear well. I am anxious to hear what household activities I can give mom to do. Right now, she can dry the dishes (when she feels like it) and help fold socks and underwear. She makes her own bed and picks out her own clothes. She is eager to help me, but honestly, it makes more work for me. For example, if she wants to put dishes away, I have to guide her hand to the shelf every time. Then the dementia kicks in and I have to remind her what she's doing. She is still able to understand when I say to her "Mom. if you could see I'd have you do...." It's frustrating for both of us.

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Give her a basket of towels to fold.
Once she has done them tell her that you will put them away and if sh is up to it you have some socks to pair. Tell her that they are all the same color so they are all the same.
When she has done them you can start the process over.
Take the same towels, the same socks and have her fold them every day.
You could give her "silverware" to "polish" ..a few pieces of silverware and a cloth would keep her busy.

If you don't have enough towels or socks at home a resale shop would be an inexpensive place to get some.

How about cutting coupons? Even if you never use them it is a "project"
Do you have a lot of plastic storage bowls? You could remove all the lids and then ask if she could put the lids on so you can put them away.
When the dishes are done could you give her the silverware and a plastic silverware tray and ask if she could place the spoons, forks knives (table knives not sharp ones) in the holder and then you can put it back in the drawer. She can do that sitting at the table while you do the rest of the dishes.
She could be given the "job" of wiping the table after meals.

Thank you for wanting to make her feel needed and useful. And bless her for still wanting to help out.
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Is she able to go to a senior day program? That might provide her with all day or half day activities that would tire her out and maybe folding clothes will be enough for her then. I realize her limited vision could be an issue.

Also, it depends on her level of progression, but, sometimes there are activity boards that the person may find amusing. There are websites where you can find them. Some are geared for those with dementia, visually impaired, etc. It provides something to do with your hands and keeps the mind busy too. Of course, with the short term memory declining, you often have to support them in using the devices, reminding them, encouraging them to use them, but, that's just something that can't be avoided. I don't know of any activities that the person with dementia would be able to do on their own initiative and accomplish without direction and supervision.
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I almost know your pain. The only difference is that my mother has great eyesight and has trouble walking. My mom doesn't always want to help out, but when she does, it gives me a lot more work to do in setting everything up so she can do a project. And my mom has moderate dementia, too. She especially likes to fold towels and washcloths, but she does a terrible job at it, not remembering how. It took me a long time to get over the feeling that I'm cleaning the house by myself at a good pace, and it'll be faster if I do it all, without all the hassle. But mom got depressed. Before the dementia, she was the keeper of the house. And frankly -- back then, she was ten times a better housekeeper than I'll ever be. She still wants to feel useful, like there's still a purpose for her existence. It makes her happy. So I changed my mindset: What does it matter if it takes more time for mom to get a chore done? So what if I have to fill the laundry basket with only towels, set up a card table for her in the living room, and bring the basket to her? After she's done, I take the basket back to the bathroom, re-fold them, and put them away, which would have taken me five or ten minutes to do by myself. I thank her for helping me out, because in her mind, she's done the task perfectly. Sometimes I have to remind her of what she's set out to do. She gets distracted easily. She also likes to help with recipes. I have to show her step by step how to measure ingredients and how to use a mixer, every time. In my mind, I'm frustrated and impatient, but I keep it in check. It won't help to remind her that she'd do a greater job if she could only see what you want her to do. She's in moderate dementia. She'll understand that she's being a burden to you, and she'll feel really bad about herself for not being able to do everything just the way you like it. I can't change my mom. She's still has days when she realizes that there's something wrong with her, and for even a fleeting moment, she's scared, before her memory impairment takes that moment away. I had to change, so I wouldn't keep flying off the handle all the time. I recommend that you watch some YouTube videos made by a dementia specialist named Teepa Snow. There are a lot of them. She's funny and her she shows you the world through the eyes of the dementia patient. Mom also likes to count coins so we can roll them. She doesn't know it, but I go back through them later, to check her miscounts. But once again, it makes her happy. I encourage her and we talk about how great it will be, once we cash them in. We can use it for "fun money." She helped me make a floral arrangement, by showing me where to put the flowers. I asked her what color would be best in a certain spot. She loved it. I could go on and on, but you know what I mean.
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What about washing vegetables and fruits when you bring them home from grocery shopping? She could wash them in a sink full of cool water and polish and dry them before placing them in a bowl or a basin to go in the fridge. Mostly a tactile activity so not too much eyesight required, and the cool water will feel nice during the hot summer months.
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My Mom also used to like to fold the laundry. She could do it sitting down and it was a repetitive action. She loved to help me decorate for the holidays, showing me where to put things on the windows and helping me to unpack the items from storage containers. She had cats that came to live with us and she enjoyed taking care of them. Also, she was responsible (with my help) to make her bed every morning, and to take her clothing and towels to the washroom. We would often start the washer and dryer, and later she would fold her clothes. She did a pretty good job, and at some point that has to be enough. She had a routine every morning such as washing, dressing, brushing teeth, picking up her clothing, making her bed, and taking her clothing to the laundry room. Then she would feed her cats, and sit down for breakfast. The afternoon was spent on activities and then in the evening we would plan a meal and she would sit up at the kitchen island and help with setting plates and folding a napkin for each of us. We would chat while I cooked. She felt involved and thrived in that environment. I never knew how important that was until she passed. In her effort to help she felt loved rather than a burden. She felt like she was part of our household rather than just a boarder. She felt like she was doing her part. Don't get me wrong...it took time, and sometimes it would have been easier to do it myself, but I noticed that in my hurry I totally disabled her. After that I learned to slow down a bit and just let it be. To see the smile of accomplishment on her face was worth it.
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Remember it is an elderly person's way of being a part of your household and not feeling like they are a burden. Who care's if what she does is perfect or if it takes time. She will feel like she is helping and being a part of your family rather than just boarding with you. Take the time. Nothing in life is as important as the time you are spending now.
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Same boat. Mom is 96, blind, wheelchair. Her repertoire is limited but she can: fold hand towels, dish towels and wash clothes (which I keep in a perpetual "to do basket"); pull grapes off the stems for me (which is awesome when making chicken salad); give "neck rubs" (no pressure in fingers but very nice anyway with me sitting on a stool in front of her wheelchair)
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Unfortunately, we have no senior day programs in our area.
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I watched an Alzheimer's video that showed the DH folding towels.

It would have to be something easy and not 'dangerous' - dusting might work as long as there are no breakables. She'd probably keep dusting the same table but so what - it's all about being needed I think.
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Because of her low vision, she will be eligible for helpful items from her state's Commissioner of the Blind. Such items can be large magnifying glasses, lighted white canes, kind of device where you put a piece of paper under the machine, it enlarges it and you can write with it, plus photo ID.
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