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Am currently adult caregiver to 94 y/o mother and living in her home for 9 yrs. We want to sell the house but protect the assets. Mom will either move with us to Mexico or go into assisted living in Pennsylvania. She has enough monthly income to pay for assisted living. Our concern is if she were to opt for PA but then require a nursing home environment we would have to pay from home sale proceeds. Could we be co-owners in a property in Mexico paid for by the sale of her home here, even if she resides primarily in PA?

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Nicely stated Rainmom.
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I think about the poor people caring for an elderly loved one at home - the people who "fall through the cracks" - don't have enough money to pay for IL or AL - and they are not impaired enough to qualify for a nursing home - which in their state is the only thing Medicaid will cover. So, they either live on their own, constantly at risk or someone moves in or moves the loved one in and they do the best they can with little to no support.

I can't help but wonder what type of resources could be made available with all the money the government spends on the whole look-back process, fighting Medicaid abusers or having the funds contributed by the covered person - their assets - instead of another family member hiding the them for their own potential inheritance.

I don't get how some people fail to see that paying for their care - if they have the funds - is a reasonable expectation.

I get it, I really do - it's hard to watch your parents hard earned money disappearing at an alarming rate to pay for their elder care - when the person in the next room is there on a full ride scholarship curtesy of Medicaid. Personally, as I'm finishing up probate for my mothers estate I can't help but think of the hundreds of thousands of dollars - the honest truth- my parents spent on IL, AL, NH and in-home caregivers. It sure would have been nice to inherit that money! BUT, that is the price we pay in a civilized society to take care of our elderly who have no financial resources. And, I'm okay with that. I wish more people were as well. If they were - maybe Medicaid would have enough money to provide much needed additional support to the brave souls taking care of their elderly loved ones at home.
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I believe that all citizens are entitled to avail themselves of all the benefits provided by law. I try to take all tax deductions I am eligible for, even if some of them seem strange.

I believe that family caregivers save this nation millions of dollars a year, and that someone who has sacrificed to provide this valuable (and as we all know, challenging) service should be able to inherit what meager assets may be left when the impaired person dies.

I believe that it is a disgrace that this nation considers caring for our elders to be "welfare" that they should be embarrassed to accept.

But then, I also believe that men should pay for insurance policies that cover pregnancies and women should pay for policies that cover prostate cancer and that citizens without children should pay taxes for schools. Some things are community responsibilities. Some things we should all pay for. I happen to think that caring for the elderly is among them.

I also believe in cost/benefit analysis. It is far less costly for a state or county to keep an elder at home than in a nursing home. And I think there should be far more benefits and supports for family members who make personal sacrifices that save all taxpayers money.

Among the population aged 65+, 69% will develop disabilities before they die, and 35% will eventually enter a nursing home. If family care can delay the nursing home placement by two years or five years, or, as in tommott54' case, nine years, that is certainly a good thing for all of us taxpayers.
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Jeanne is correct there are exemptions to Medicaid recovery. If you provided doctor stated, medically necessary care for mom, for a period of two years, the house may be eligible for transfer to you without penalty.
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Did you live in that house with her, caringiving there? That would be one of grounds for an exception to the state recovering their expenses when the house is sold. You may be allowed to receive the house when your mother dies. I'm not sure about selling it while she is still alive.

I think this is a question you should pose to Medicaid in your state, or to an attorney who specializes in Elder Law.
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If mom has Medicaid now there are probably already liens on the house.
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Mom is on Medicaid now? Do you think it is right for all of us to pay for mom's care when she has assets?
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