Will hospice come to my home for end-of-life care for my mom?

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I would also ask if you've ever cared for someone who is dying? Or do you plan to hire caregivers? It isn't for the faint of heart. Are you prepared for diapers, sitting up at night if you're mom is having a tough time or wandering? In the month prior to his passing my father could barely stand yet for some inexplicable reason he would wake at night and be able to wander around their apartment - before he would fall and mom would call me to help get him up and back into bed. Like the previous poster - having had gone through this once, I would never choose to have someone pass at home again - at least not without round the clock, medically trained caregivers.
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Pam is correct. At home hospice for my dad required someone family home 24/7 and did not supply "custodial" care. We hired an aide for custodial care and mom was present to meet the family requirement.
They provided 24x7 onsite nurse while the patient was being stabelized or once death was immenant. You potentially can have weeks or months were hospice only drops by a few hours a week.
Having experienced this with dad, I will not be able to do it again, and hold a job....remember the timeline is always unknown
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Hospice in the home requires that someone be there with the patient at ALL times 24/7. If she is happy where she is, I would not uproot her from that. Your intentions are wonderful, but no one person can do what three shifts of aides and nurses can do.
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Thanks for the info. My mom has gastric cancer and is fine right now (and is is living in assisted care facility and they do have aging in place with folks receiving hospice in the facility). We know it is late stage, and we'd like to care for her at home. Her current place is great and we have few complaints, but I want to manage her pain and make sure she is given every comfort without waiting. The caregivers only have so many hands to care for many residents.

Any info and feedback is helpful! Thanks!
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I want to give you a heads up that Hospice may not be all you think it is. Hospice programs and their employees are really wonderful and valuable - but it's not full-time or really even part-time care, although there can be slight differences based on the provider. Basically, there will be a nurse that comes to the home once or twice a week, maybe an additional visit as end of life gets close. The nurse will check vitals, weight and address issues such as bedsores, UTIs, pain levels, etc. these visits aren't long. A Chaplin will be available to visit regularly for spiritual guidance or even just to visit with the patient. Usually there is a social worker involved to help assess needs and resources. There also is a bath attendent who can come help shower the person. Usually a hospital bed, pain/stress medication for the patient and incontenent supplies are provided free of charge. There are also Hospice facilities where the patient can go to live out what time is left or even stay for a shorter time to give respite to family at home - this is not free but if there is supplemental insurance it may be covered that way. Maybe you already know all this...I think however, perhaps based on things we see in movies or on television there is the impression that hospice provides a full time angel of mercy to stay with the patient throughout the day or even around the clock - I know that was both my mothers and my impression when my father went from palliative care to hospice. Don't get me wrong - I really do consider hospice a true blessing - went through it with my dad four years ago and now my mother is receiving hospice care at her nursing home - since February. I would not hesitate to recommend to anyone to use this service - it really can be both helpful and comforting - for both patient and family.
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Hospice care can happen in your home, or in a hospice facility. Not all hospice centers have both choices, but a lot do. I'm sure you can find one that fits your choice. They make the end of life so much more comfortable for both the patient and the family.

Angel
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