Has anyone experienced HHC agencies claiming live-in aides are overworked and pushing for supplemental aides?

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Feels shady. My parents have live-in care. Both are in wheelchairs but can walk with walkers. Mom sleeps in a pull-up, Dad is catheterized. HHC agency is saying the aide is not getting enough sleep and is pushing for an additional aide at night. Our current aide is not complaining and I feel the agency is just trying to get more money out of us. My sister visits 1-2 hours daily (the aide takes that time to herself) and both parents say they rarely get up at night. They are also pleasant and grateful (our current aide says they are very nice people). Any advice on how to push back with the agency? We're NOT shelling out for a second aide.

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Emphasis on "FOR PROFIT CARE". If this agency can convince you they need to "add more services" then it is more money in their pockets. There is a multitude of criminals in this field and I suspect they often "cause" a need for additional services. Beware.
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Daughterct, Is it the buzzer noise, or is it an overall fear? You need to cover this with her and use progressive discipline. A verbal warning if she cannot respond. A written warning for the second failure. A final warning with notice of termination for a third failure. Timestamped video is strongly recommended. Without hard evidence of progressive discipline, she will file for unemployment and probably get it.
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Thanks all for your input! I stayed with my parents and my mom slept through the night. My dad asked for help at 5 AM. Considering he was put to bed at 8:30, that doesn't seem unreasonable. He can't move around on his own, so so many hours in one position can get uncomfortable. It seems, though, that our aide--who is live-in, but does not bathe my parents and is spelled by another aide every 12 days--is frightened by the buzzer we have hooked up by Dad's bed. Apparently, her brother died of a heart attack and she fears the same for herself? I know you have to trust the people who are caring for your aged parents, but she ( the main aide) seems a little off?? Any advice on how to handle THIS situation?
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Its a great suggestion to spend time to make the determination yourself. My current situation with an HHA . I agree that it is often the management trying to get their billing up especially since they are providing care for two. Push back since if they knew what they were accepting or find a new agency or private hire. Our private hire does twice the work that the HHA staff does. Good luck this stuff is never easy.
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Many health care agencies don't have enough staff to fill the need. It sounds like the aide is in the home 24/7--you didn't indicate. The aide sleeps at night and she is rarely called upon. If the aide isn't complaining and she receives adequate breaks/time for herself then I don't see a problem. It wouldn't hurt to introduce a second aide to offer some relief for your current caregiver, however I know it's sometimes difficult to find the 'right' person that is able to get along well with your parents and your family. I think it's good you will be spending some time there to access the caregiving duties and the possible 'burden' on your current caregiver.
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Very important topic, seems to me - I find it very distressing that agencies often want to be the spokesperson to the family, and do this without the direct care aide present for any meeting. When I hired helpers for my brother, I called while they were there and listened to them, so that when I later spoke with the agency, I gave them the dilemmas, and had solutions in mind. But that's because I did a lot of care for my brother myself, and knew his pace and needs. Yes, stay there yourself, or videotape - and ask the aide to document her shift - how often does the elder ask her to get up? Or ask the agency to ask her to document - or ask that she come to the next meeting. Don't be afraid to tell the agency that you feel OK with a different plan. Yes, sometimes aides are glad to have an agency speak for them, but often the agency has multiple goals - like scheduling others for instance, using this aide elsewhere, avoiding overtime pay hours. That is normal, so try to find out what are their concerns. Maybe temporarily, they need an extra aide? If so, get the current one on board, and make sure you stand up for her remaining there, when temporary is gone.
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I care for my mother who is fully ambulatory. She is a little off - senile and has visual artifacts due to macular degeneration partial blindness. She sometimes has night terrors and she wears a c-pap at night, refusing to use the potty chair beside the bed, it must be refitted each time she goes to the bathroom, usually a couple of times per night. I am sleep deprived! Your caregiver may be also.
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Good point the Nurse has if you being talking in front of the aide and talking about money she might now want to say anything cause she don't want to lose her job. so the agency is talking on her behalf. before they lose her and she has to find another job cause this one is killing her.
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We were also dropped from an agency without a reason and no notice. The caretaker didn't show up for work. I didn't call to find out why because we weren't satisfied with the company anyway. I did call to ask for the $400 deposit back. They said we dropped them without notice and refused to give the deposit back. We have been caring for my father-in-law 24/7 for many years now and believe me caretakers need a break even if they don't complain. My husband is an only child so we don't have any relatives to help. We hired another healthcare agency and then fired them because the caretaker was telling the agency lies about us. Like the agency that dropped us they didn't deliver the care that was promised. Agencies give a list of what they do. The list usually includes vacuuming and dusting the living room and one bedroom, cleaning the kitchen and bathroom, showering, dressing, preparing meals, changing the bed and doing the laundry. The caretaker only had to vacuum the bedroom with a sitting area, clean the bathroom, change the bed, shower and dress my mother-in-law and feed them lunch. My father-in-law said the caretaker would sit and talk on the phone and he would have to make lunch. He was 88 and his wife was 89 and both using walkers. The caretaker was not vacuuming but she said she was. If she was, why were me and my husband having to do it? I do not require things to be immaculate but I don't like seeing pieces of food and lint all over the floor.
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Marketwatch has a blog that addresses elder care and caregiving that is worthwhile reading. Google:
"Elder-care aides stuck without wage hike"

a good place to start.
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