Is home care deductable?

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We have a service that provides a person to come stay with Mom 3 days a week for 5 hours so she can bath, etc. Is this tax deductible?

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The poster's income tax return should be relatively simple. In order to claim medical (expenses) it #1 must be an itemized return and #2 must be above 10% of AGI.
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Keep detailed records of all expenses, even medical, such as OTC tylenol, prilosec, etc.
If not for taxes, when applying for Medicaid, there is a Medi-Cal portion to qualify for. Your parent's income might be just a bit too high to qualify.
In that case, the Medi-Cal portion takes that income and decreases it by your medical expenses. That decrease can be just enough to qualify for Medicaid.
Disclaimer: Hope I got this right, because no one tells you about it in advance, you may need a lawyer that specializes in benefits counseling.

Back to the OP's question about taxes......
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Everyone else gave good answers. I just want to point out that there are no refunds, no matter if the expenses are deductible, if no taxes were paid into the IRS to start with. In other words, if all the income is social security, or a small retirement....and it's not taxable income, then the standard deduction is going to mean that no matter how much more you have in medical, it makes no difference in terms of a refund. I just went over my parents back taxes for 2013. They cashed in some large investments, so that over $90,000 could be paid out in medical for private pay memory care and lots of other stuff. NO REFUND beause, even with adding in the taxes on the investments we closed out, the total income with SS and retirement didn't permit paying any taxes, so no deductions were allowed past the standard. No taxes due....and no refunds allowed.
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It is deductible only if it's an itemized return and it's above 10 % AGI.
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Just to clarify, since my original answer was so brief. My folks were getting assistance that their doctor felt was necessary. My dad was legally blind and both of them had mobility issues. There were specific things that could be included in the medical deductions and things that could not. So I kept detailed records on everything, and the accountant made the final decision on what could be included. It is very complicated.
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Yes I do believe that it is. Check with a tax preparer first, but my father had homecare for a while before they moved into assisted living and we did get alot of help from their taxes.
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If the care is required per the primary care physician, make sure you have them sign a document that mandates assistance and then talk to your tax accountant
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Btw, I didnt mean to convict GrandmaLynn's parents. Their care may be medically necessary, so it may be deductible for them. But general personal care expenses are not deductible.
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It can be a Deduction when a lot of qualifications or conditions are met. Some include doctor's diagnoses, guardianship, family vs professional paid care, etc.. There is even in a new bill that covers family caretakers to be paid if they work. Try to read articles from all sources before your seek an one "expert's" recommendations.
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Unless care is medically necessary (like that of a skilled nurse, RN or maybe LPN) it's not legally deductible as a medical expense. Help with bathing, housework, etc. is not deductible. GrandmaLynn's parents may have been taking a deduction for it and not getting audited (caught); but that's not the IRS rule.
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