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And toilet and shower. Is availability worldwide?

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There is a product I ran across that may be interesting to many. It is called a Port-a-Lift and you can see it at website: Port-a-Lift. It is a powered 18# apparatus that can hook onto multiple brackets you can install next to a toilet, bed, bathtub, table, in a car, etc. The same 18# rig can hook into any location and lift a person from a seated position to a seated position. Pretty cool idea but somewhat costly (especially the proper mounting of the brackets). However no Hoyer to muscle around, no ceiling track system, etc. Very versatile and the 18# rig is easy to relocate. Might for perfect depending on the particular situation.
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I have a medicare manual hoyer in a small bedroom and it does not whatsoever take up a lot of space. My mom cannot talk or walk but when I tell hers going up for a magic carpet ride she loves it. I wish I could post pictures. She is 92 with alz/ dementia.
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Also, addition, I got a padded commode because he sits for a very long time and I put wheels on it. The hardware store has the castors and little plastic things that fill the space between the castor stem and the leg of the commode. It is so easy to move around!
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We managed (are managing) for quite a while with super poles (transfer poles on Google) and a commode. We have a Milford Person Lift installed in the car which picks him up from the wheelchair and swings him into the front passenger seat. It is portable and also installs in the bathroom for putting him in the shower. It can also put him on the toilet. We have recently installed a Liko overhead lift in the bedroom which will take him from chair to commode or chair to bed and vice versa. These lifts are expensive. We have Long Term Care Insurance which is covering them. You might be able to get an advance ok from Medicare with a dr. prescription. Tell them you don't have room for a hoyer.
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Hate to see people get "hoyered" unless it is absolutely necessary because being slinged around no longer uses muscles the same and strength will be lost. The longer a person can safely help themselves the better off they will be. If there is any leg strength SuperPoles or Friendly Beds may be good solution (see website: AbleData. A person can pull themselves standing and then pivot into a wheelchair. If decent upper body strength a person can reposition and bed transfer themselves (even with no leg strength) with Friendly Beds.
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Some of the ability to transfer is facilitated by the caregiver helping them move in small increments, being patient and encouraging them to keep sliding forward, or sidewards, inch by inch into position to transfer. I'm a small person, and have helped some large people, because I notice and put in place, some solid thing they can grab onto, if their arms work, for instance. I set up barriers to prevent falling - like a dresser - or someone here suggested a guard rail not for containment but for the purpose of having them help pull, so that a caregiver is not trying to lift them, only to work with them to manoeuver them safely. Safety is critical, at every moment, so they are never in risk of fall without a nearby soft landing - but have a fall-back place always underneath them.

But if they can use their arms to help, it makes a difference to caregiver, and also to them, realizing they are able to help, and look ahead, and as long as they go inch by inch, with safe backup - I show them where the next point is that they need to grab or sit is - they can pivot on their legs, or hip. I've used a Hoyer lift to transfer a very large woman who could not use her legs, from bed to chair, but in bed, I'd have her help me roll her, by telling her to grab the rails, and waiting until she does, and then she can pull and hold herself up, till I put a cushion under her. Using her energy kept us helping each other.
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Don't know if this would work for you but I have seen elderly very comfortable in the recliner chairs that go into a lifting position. A hoyer lift can take up a lot of space and be a bit difficult to manage at times. Really depends on their ability to transfer - if they have any ability to transfer - good luck.
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If your patient is totally dependent on you for transferring from bed to chair, toileting, etc because their legs are no longer functional and you have to bear the majority of their weight then a hydraulic patient lift is the answer. There are several styles to choose from depending on the need. There are also several styles of slings to use with this lift and it is best to explore this area before getting one.
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I believe it is called a Hoyer Lift. Medicare should pay for it too.
You have been given all the information you need -go get the Rx. for the lift.
Blessings are...
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I guess it's not possible to use a transfer board and positioning? Some wheelchairs used to have removable arms, thus creating space to slide someone onto them sideways.
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Also you could google BARRIER FREE LIFT. I had have used this lift system for over 16 years...with my private client who he had MS.
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Medicare pays for it if the doctor writes a prescription.i got one for my mom and use it all the time. Amazon sells them for under $500 also
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Hoyer lift.....google it -
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