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I am considering hiring a caregiver outside of an agency as agencies charge a very high rate. Is it normal to require that the potential caregiver have insurance?

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Thanks for your feedback, it has all be very helpful. The caregiver I was contemplating never got back to me. So for now I will stay with the agency.
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Tammy how much do you think you should make for a 24 hour shift? My Mom has MS and she needs to be changed, she doesn't weight much maybe 120. How much do you think a 24 hour caregiver should charge at a fair price for both parties?
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I am PRIVATE PCT, CNA i do have all requirements to come into the home- insurance is a necessity and all private care licensed should have this its for the client not the caregiver..
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You are putting your loved one in jeopardy if you hire someone who has not passed a background check, has a bond, and many references. Your money, your risk.
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Reverseroles- you may want to check with the IRS as to the definition of who can be paid as an independent contractor and who is an employee. After looking into it, I decided that the caregivers I hire are employees and I pay them following all the rules for household employers, withholding taxes, etc. I also cover them with workman's comp insurance that I get from my agent. I have found this to be the best way to hire and retain caregivers for my loved ones.
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Oh my gosh! Yeppers, that is exactly what is happening, Mom trusts them, I am not saying they are not trustable, and I have to ask you all is 250 a day a lot? The caregiver has 20 years experience. I really do not know and have tried not to judge. Oh my gosh they want me to go to both of there bank accounts here in Seattle and deposit there money for them. The problem is I am gone 11 hours a day working. That's twice a week running to there banks and waiting in line. If I had to do this over again I would take my time getting my Mom out of the facility and make sure there would be willing to sign a contract before hand.
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If your check with your local Area Agency on Aging, they can direct you to organizations that may be able to take care of insurances and payroll for you. I am thinking specifically of Public Partnerships that has a program in your state. But there may be others as well. I am familiar with Pubic Partnership's program In Pennsylvania. Illinois may be different.
Here is the contact information for Public Partnerships taken from their website.
Home-Based Support Services (HBSS) Participant-Directed Service Option
1-888-866-0582
I wish you and your mother well.
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I can also relate to your comment Elliebabe - my mom at 90 years of age and her friends are way too trusting of the "nice" caregivers. They all share contacts for service personnel and now caregivers. As mother tells me, "Honey, if Evie S___ uses her/him, then I just know they have to be fine." and this is what the entire dinner group tells me if I dare to gently bring up the subject. Even mentioned the insurance issue and justified it by saying I had indeed asked a caregiver for her license and insurance paperwork. The caregiver assured me she had it and would get it to me. I got tired of waiting after a week of promises and excuses and it gave me a solid reason to let her go. But I got quickly scolded like a child -I am 61 :) - by the very people who had always taught us to be careful and not take risks just like what they were doing. Bottom line: I am exceedingly concerned about the seniors/elderly who are and will be "taken" by unscrupulous "caregivers"...and always tell friends and clients to do their homework and check out backgrounds no matter what! BTW, that same "Evie" friend my mother referenced above, gave mom a referral of a TV repair man - long story short: she got scammed out of over $500 CASH and had her 2 year old HD TV "replaced because it couldn't be fixed" with a "brand new one" for just $300! Turned out the TV was a refurbished TV worth $169 new at Walmart. And this guy actually "borrowed" the Angie's List logo for his website...they went after him as did the local sheriff's department when I reported him. But my mom still thought she should call him in the future for repairs cause "Evie still uses him." (Note: Dr. says mild cognitive decline - dementia - early Alzheimers but NOT incapacitated for decision-making.) Fun fun fun. :)
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We did a contract just like you talk about Reverseroles, the caregivers refused to sign and my Mom said it was fine, the one caregiver is charging 250 a day, that too I let my Mom and her work it out. My Mom steps on what I do, the caregivers wrote their own contract and signed and notorized them. I am stuck with them for now because my Mom trusts them and they take good care of her, they are sisters, one we pay 200 a day and the other 250.
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Goldens4love - great point. This reminded me of another "liability" concern. When my mom was still living in her home (she is now in NH and on hospice) she had rotor cuff repair surgery and then had an agency caregiver for several weeks while she recovered & after I left. The agency required from my mom that the caregiver would drive my mom's car to run errands or to take mom to doc appt's or PT sessions. Mom had to fax over a copy of her auto insurance for the agency's files. If something happened at the house or grocery store or doctors, then the agency's policy covered it, but if something happened while caregiver in the car, then my mom's policy was first for liability.
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We had our caregivers sign a form stating that they are independent contractors, will pay their own taxes and have their own insurance. If they dont, thats up to them but it covers us. You can call your own homeowners insurance also. I found agency caregivers to not be as good as private ones, and they are less money. 3 I dodged later , from an agency, were sued for stealing. I installed cameras and went thru many to find the perfect one. good luck
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I encountered this situation earlier this year and was advised by our insurance broker this way: if the independent caregiver is hired, the insurance company wanted copies of the person's state license and proof of self-insurance, otherwise, my mother would have to be responsible for ANYTHING that happened to the caregiver when she was on-duty and/or on the premises of the condo building coming/going to care for my mother. Thus, we hired the caregiver through a very reliable agency whose personnel were covered by the agency's insurance.
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Individual insurance like liability would probably be too expensive for an independent to afford. But they could get bonded, that would be lots cheaper.

What is your concern about the insurance?

You should contact your homeowners insurance agent to see how your policy does or doesn't cover if a care-giver gets hurt or injured when on your property.
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I know caregivers that are very good, most have there CNA certificate, none I know that work on their own have insurance. If you want insurance you are best off with an agency, but you will pay more.

Consider the rate independents make $10 to $12 an hour in Miami, last time I looked was about a year ago. Hard to afford insurance on that

The key is to find one that is recommended and that you and mostly the patient bond with.

Good luck
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When I went to the Center on Aging in our town they gave us a list of independent respite caregivers who had a background check done by the state but could be hired outside of the agency for $10/hour rather than the $20/hour through an agency.
I don't know if they have insurance. What type of insurance are you speaking of?
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