Hiring a private caregiver. Good or bad?

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It is definitely less expensive than an agency, but how to handle workers comp. and payroll taxes? Who will be responsible for caregiver's health insurance?
Bill

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No we do a 1099 just like a contractor. :)
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For montana 1122 Did you have to buy worker's comp. for them?
Thank you all for your help.
Bill
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I have four PD CNA's that help with my Dad, three have been with me for about a year. Care.com is a great tool, but be sure you do a thorough background check yourself. Nanny Cam's are all over our home to. It is hard but so much better than an agency you just have to listen to everyone's needs. And most of all listen to your loved one!
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I've been doing some research lately and found out that YOU can hire someone paying them like a private contractor. You pay them a set amount, give them a 1099 form so THEY have to pay all the taxes. You can talk to your homeowners re insurance and get an Umbrella policy.

You're better off hiring through an agency. They generally provide work comp insurance. However, they don't all take out taxes. Some agencies pay their employees like indep contractors. They will provide you with workers if yours calls in sick.

The biggest problem is getting qualified help. HHAs are probably the closest to what you need for home care. However, they don't seem to be trained in medication, Diabetes, and some of the big medical issues. I've noticed that there is a gap between what is needed and how each "profession" (CNA, HHA, CMA) is trained. RNs are expensive.

Maybe others here have different experiences.
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My boss was using a private Caregiver for his late wife, who had Alzheimer's. Seemed like every six months the Caregivers were quitting and he would have to look for someone new.

And like Maggie said above, what would happen if she/he doesn't show up? My Boss ran into that quite a bit as his last Caregiver had grade school children and if one child became sick, the Caregiver couldn't come in. Otherwise, she was really a great help to him when she did.
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You won't be required to have health insurance for just one employee. So that's a consideration that the care giver should take into account when accepting a salary. You'll handle payroll taxes, contribute to her Social Security, collect SS from her paycheck and file at least a quarterly return to state and Federal governments. A local CPA should be able to help you with those forms. Worker's comp? I'm not sure. It may (or may not) be required for one employee in your state. Frankly? I'd be more comfortable if it was since, if she were injured while performing her duties for you, she could sue you personally. And read this: Your homeowners insurance would NOT cover her.

You have much to be concerned with in hiring a personal caregiver directly. Insurance and liability being one. Background and reference checks being another. If she's live-in, you run the risk that she'll squat on your property and you might have to take formal steps to evict her even if she were doing a terrible job. If she's not live-in, you have to worry about what you'll do when she doesn't show up . . . sick days . . . vacation days . . . I-don't-feel-like-going-to-work days. All of which you DON'T have to worry about if you use a service.

In suburban Chicago, the rate is $22 an hour for daytime/evening help. I wouldn't do it any other way. But that's me.
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