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He needs physical therapy and the therapists on staff are worthless....gave him 15 minutes when he first got there and he has physically deterioated

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Thanks so much for your answer. Just not impressed with the therapists at the nursing home.
Pegann
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Pegann, you'd have to check with the nursing home to see if they allow private therapy. Doesn't this facility have therapists on staff, or is it that they can't treat him b/c of the Medicare issues?

If Medicare is the issue, you might ask them if they'll treat him if you pay for it privately.

You can also ask one of his physicians, particularly the one who recommended nursing home treatment, to help get a Medicare extension of PT. It can be done, especially if the doctor certifies that continuing PT will help whatever condition PT was originally scripted for. If there's a new diagnosis, PT can also be extended, based on what I've read.

It's worth a try.
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Babalou, great, really great news! What do you think caused the change?
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Update yo my June 18 posting; my mom is walking again with a walker!
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Husband has exhausted medicare benefits for PT for this calendar year. Can I pay for private therapist to come to nursing home to provide PT?
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I want to add my current experience with pt for my 92 you mom at her nh. After stroke and broken hip, she was rehabilitated to the point of walking independently with a walker. However, a 5 day hospitalization last year left her very weak, and although pt tried mightily, they could not get her walking again. So she's been with therapy and in a wheelchair for about 6 months. Interestingly, a few weeks ago, we noticed that she had started to wheel herself using her feet, so we asked pt to reevaluate. She's been getting therapy three times a week. We'll see how this progresses.
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I tried to get it for my cousin, but the doctor said that Medicare would only cover it under certain conditions, such as a good likelihood she would benefit. They did not think that about her. Plus, she resisted and was not cooperative with therapy. Still, the staff work with her and try to keep her muscles toned.
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Unless he was too debilitated when he arrived to do more therapy, 15 minutes isn't adequate. In my experience, it's generally around 45 minutes but that's for rehab specifically in skilled nursing facilities.

Were there discussions, i.e., representations on the part of the admin staff as to duration of PT sessions before he was placed there? Have you documented the amount of time for each PT session and discussed it with the administrative staff?

Are you otherwise satisfied with this facility? If not, perhaps it's time to consider another facility.

But as suggested, I would raise the issue with his doctor and make it clear you're dissatisfied.

I'm also wondering if the staff will claim that b/c of his dementia it's hard to give him longer therapy.
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When my mom was in a nursing home/rehab for a broken arm, the only PT they had her do was in a group format and mom remained in a wheelchair the entire time. I spoke with the doctor and the head therapist requesting that my mom receive private therapy for walking since she went into rehab walking and hadn't walked in 5 days. I was not permitted to try and walk with mom myself until the therapist could evaluate and this took another 2 days. You have the right to request additional therapy but I would try first with the facility and specify exactly what you would like done. I spent everyday from 8 to 5 in the nursing home with mom so I was aware of exactly what her therapy consisted of. Good luck.
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I would talk to the rehab director and find out why they only gave him 15 minutes of therapy. Is that based upon your observation of his therapy sessions?

Is it possible that your LO was refusing therapy, or was uncooperative? I would make sure I have the whole story before I brought in a private therapist. You might also take your dad to a physiatrist, a type of doctor who specializes in this sort of medicine for a second opinion and perhaps a more detailed prescription for the type of therapy he needs.
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You can only clear that with the Nursing Home. They are terrified of liability and will insist the therapist is licensed, insured and background checked. The PT orders have to come from an MD, not from family. See the MD.
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