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I am thinking of installing a "Nanny Cam" type of camera in moms home so I can check up on her when I have to work and cant be there. Moms health is rapidly declining do to various health problems. She wants to remain in her home for as long as possible but is resistant to any outside help. I feel bad wanting to do this but I cant be there all the time and have no one else to check up on her.

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I'd be uncomfortable putting it in without telling her. If her memory is declining, she'll likely forget about it but I still believe in elders' rights. That being said, I know how hard it is to not be able to know what's going on and a camera may make you feel better.

We got along well with personal alarms which my mom used often but they depend on the person being willing (and remembering) to wear them. In the end, it's your decision about whether to tell her or not. We all have different situations. Whatever you decide I'd choose one with a password as Harpcat suggested. Nothing is hack proof, but a strong password will keep the neighbors from intruding anyway (unless you have some very unusual neighbors: )
Carol
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While DaveIFM brings up good points, I did want to state that Piper does take security precautions and is password protection. Does that mean it couldn't be "hacked" into? Well you can ask China for that answer...even the CIA can be hacked into. Now if someone hacked into my dad's camera, they would get bored very quickly seeing him watch TV most of the day. LOL
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There is lots of stuff out there from very simple and cheap to very sophisticated. I haven't used the stuff but you'll get info here from people who have. I would think you have two choices: hide the stuff very well and hope Mom doesn't find it and freak, or have a heart to heart and convince her that it's a good thing. Also if she agrees it's much easier to set up a system that's not hidden.
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We use a Piper camera just in my dads living room/kitchen area of his apartment not in his bedroom. He is aware of it and approved of it. We told him it was in case he doesn't respond to a call or he's not feeling well and to be sure if he falls we can get help. He has pull cords in the bedroom and bathroom but not in that area. It also enables us to speak to him through it if we want to.
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we used a video system for my father who was developing dementia, he approved it at the time and it was a big help in monitoring him while we were not with him.
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Best thing I ever did. However, I would not hide it. Sit down and discuss it with them and put the camera's in places that aren't private. I have mine in the den where my mother sits all the time and I can see parts of the kitchen. The second one is in our living room where she sits sometimes as well. You could put it in the hall outside the bedroom that way you can see when she gets up. I also have emails sent from the camera's when there is motion. That way I can tell when she is up and moving around. If I don't see her on the camera or emails after an extended period of time, I can run home and check on her. Trust me it has been a Godsend.
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Purchase one for $100 at Costco and downloaded the app for free on smart phone. I told my aging parents it is a security camera to ensure their safety. It is placed prominently in the dining area which expands to kitchen, hall to bedroom/bathroom and living room. I can see if mom is taking her am pills, if each parent is getting around ok, weighing in as required. Best money eve spent!
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some state laws limit how and where hired caregivers may be monitored; while federal wiretap law makes it illegal to record oral communication, which is why surveillance cameras usually lack audio.

YOU, employer, must let workers know that cameras are being used

Beware: That baby monitor on which you rely to watch your LO can also be used by would-be burglars and others to snatch the signal from afar and peer into your house.

The potential problem lies in the open and unlicensed radio frequencies that video monitors use. Your device's signal could be picked up by the receiver of a stranger's video monitor, giving that person a live video feed of your room while the transmitter is on.
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Have you discussed this with your mother? You cannot install a surveillance camera without prior knowledge. No matter how worried you are about her, she still has the right to live in her home without being spied on, and you need her permission. What will happen will happen regardless of a camera. Be careful.
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I agree with all posters here; and I've not done one -- however, I've often thought about it. My mother would adamently refuse it if I even brought it up because of her existing paranoia, dementia and already believe neighbors are spying on her (a streetlamp shines in her house at night).

If it were me and I could put one discretely in to monitor my mom's wellbeing and keep her safe and give me as primary caregiver peace of mind; I would go ahead and do so.

Thats just my opinion. I agree there may be legal ramifications but I don't know how that can override ones safety and wellbeing when a LO lives alone and refuses help or in-home assistance.
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