Renay Asked April 2011

What is a good eating plan (7 day menu) for a terminally ill cancer patient?

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soft, nutritional food

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chill1947 Nov 2016
I lost my daughter to stage 3 ovarian cancer. Toward the end, food was not appealing to her, even things she use to love. Her body was shutting down and she had difficulties with her elimination, and eating just made her feel worse. They tried liquid nutrition, but that too could not be eliminated . All you can do is just be there with her until the end. It is heart wrenching, because we are helpless to help the one we love. May the good Lord comfort you and give you strength.
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jeannegibbs Aug 2014
Good for you, winsome! It is very caring of you to look for information and then to act on what you learn!
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winsome Aug 2014
My mom was diagnosed with ovarian cancer.she is shedding weight daily.She eats very little and sometimes tells us how skinny she is.She thinks it is because she is not eating properly.I still try to give her a fair amount of food,sometimes I cut back.I am grateful for this information I have received from the different posts,because now I can give her somethings different.I use to fuss about her not eating certain food but I have come to realize only yesterday that i need to give her what she ask for.some of the things mentioned in some of the posts are the very things she craves,pepsi,soda,(to belch) coffee,and milo,beef soup, to name a few
I just post a note on her door telling my daughter et al to give her whatever she wants,after all she is already uncomfortable,why make it worse.
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Veronica91 Jan 2014
The terminally ill body does not need food just comfort and love. Any food prepared should be in very small portions on a tiny plate, moist and easy to swallow. Keeping the mouth clean and moist adds to comfort even if the patient can not drink. If someone is vomiting after meals please don't feed them, a few bites of jello or ice cream will be soothing. Don't worry about salt or fat nothing is bad for them anymore. Request medication for vomiting and give it at least 1/2 hour before meals. Stop any medications that are not for pain or anxiety with the Dr approval. Dehydration is not painful. It is thought to release endorphins which are naturally calming. Love, love and more love is the best prescription for a diet for the terminally ill. the body does not need more fuel as it is shutting down. Think of it as a fire that is going out and enjoy the final embers as rest comes finally. You have been as honored to witness a death as you would be a birth. It is a new beginning for everyone and you should be proud of how much you have helped with this journey. Love to everyone
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lsmiami Dec 2013
Anything he craves, served with love.
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JennyM Dec 2013
Yes, popsicles are truly manna from heaven when one is sick!
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ferris1 Dec 2013
Anything they want to eat!
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Jaye Dec 2013
I would try soft things such as pudding and egg custard and soup. Things that will go down easily and also be nutritious for her. I got my Father a strawberry banana smoothie and he really enjoyed that. I actually think it was the last think he ate actually drank and enjoyed. Just play it by ear and do what you think is best. take care,
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Dajudges Dec 2013
My mother has colon cancer ,( untreatable ) and we take one meal at a time. Whatever she wants. Most is sent back eaten and she is often sick after eating. It's very hard to see her like this. She sometimes enjoy a packet of potato crisps even though we both know the salt is not good for her but her enjoyment is the most important thing. She has been bedridden since April. It's too painful for her to get out of bed and into a wheelchair.
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meohmy Oct 2013
My sister is going through this same thing with her dear companion. He is only in his early 50's and is two and half years into a diagnosis of Stage IV esophogeal cancer. His first two years he had pretty good quality of life, but now he is bed ridden and needs 24/7 care. She is a nurse so she has been an excellent caregiver for him. Anyway he is still eating but trying to plan what he will want from day to day is a challenge. So far she takes it one day at a time and prepares what he thinks he can eat at the time. She is finally getting another caregiver on board so she can work her three day twelve hour shifts at the hospital. Anyway I think it sounds like most of the people on here understand and have given good advice. Hugs to you Renay and know you are not alone.
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