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Has a hard time seeing food on her plate. She has COPD but is still able to get around with a walker.

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# A white board with phone numbers she calls
#2 A white cane
#3 A magnifying machine from the COB
#4 eye injections from her retinologist
#5 Large size check book
#6 Audio books
#7 48" television
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get one of those natural light lamps; they were a big help for my mom
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Good suggestion from Ferris. Try your county disability department too.
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To help with meals always place food the same way - eg the carb on left, veg on right & meat at bottom so she knows where to look first - discuss this with her & let her pick - try a segmented plate as it might help
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All good suggestions, which I would have written but others beat me to it! I can only add that if your mother enjoyed reading, consider books on tape. Have some "listening" sessions, stop and discuss the book, take a break and go for a walk, listen to music....

Plan her days to alter between stimulation (such as listening) and relaxing. MD can cause anxiety as the vision deteriorates, so work on calming and soothing activities for both of you.
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There are assistive devices that are especially made for folks with mac d. Contact your local Blind society, the Lions Club or local volunteer organizations who may be able to point you in the right direction. Best wishes!
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Alex, I am heartened to hear of your successful treatments for AMD, things have come a long way since my mother's diagnosis back in the 90's.

Poured, I would urge your mother to get some low vision rehab, there are many assistive devices, tips and techniques available to help her cope!
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I have had macular degeneration for 10 years. My doctor first gave me laser treatments, then after two of those, started with injections. I have had countless injections in 10 years, but the great news is, I still have 20/20 vision. I am 78, and age may make a difference.
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My Mom had macular degeneration of her eyes and she found if the room had plenty of light it helped her. In fact, when reading a newspaper, which wasn't easy, she would use a small LED flashlight.

My Dad [95] was having macular degeneration in one eye, and just recently the retina specialist were trying out doing specialized shots in the bad eye to see if it would improve one's sight. Dad said he was starting to see better from that bad eye. It's a series of shots, once a week for a while, then once every other week, etc.
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