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My FIL's legs simply don't work anymore. They have 24/7 caregivers but it is getting to the point where they can't manage him. He has a pole at the bedside as well as in the bathroom but he is still slipping to the floor even with assistance from the caregivers. Is there anything else that can be done other than having him be bedridden? He is wheelchair bound otherwise.

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Note - I've used a Hoyer lift - in a very small room - it takes a bit of time to get used to it, but there are two prongs on the bottom which can slide under a bed, then you pull it out again, doesn't take much more width than the lift. And, there is less "getting used to it" than you might think, in terms of physical experience: you position them on a sling, which you put under them, just as you would put any mat under them. Then when you pump the lever, they gradually lift up, almost sitting up in the lift - and they are still over their own bed. No danger. Only when you and they know they are balanced and all is secure and comfortable, do you then move back away from the bed, so they are then over open air, to the transfer point. It takes practice, but I found it a lot easier than I would think, by looking at it. Navigating is like moving a grocery cart. :)
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If a person has no strength left then a sling (using a Hoyer or a lift system) is the only option left but I hate to see that happen- once a person stops using their own muscles their remaining strength quickly disappears. My area of expertise is mobility problems- please contact me thru my website and I can make some recommendations after I gather some additional information.
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I'll have to ask my MIL if she thinks my FIL would be able to adjust to using some sort of equipment. He does have some dementia and "new" things tend to confuse him. Also, when he needs to go to the bathroom he needs to get there as quickly as possible and I'm not sure that there would be enough time for him to use a lift. It's not an easy situation but do appreciate everyone's input.
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Not flexible enough? I know of a lot of products that might provide help but we would have to discuss his abilities in greater detail. I could offer suggestions if you contact me thru the website listed on my profile.
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Thanks for your response. They tried a hoyer lift but he's not flexible enough to use it.
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Alot of medical supply stores will rent the lifts on a monthly basis - that is a good way to try it out.
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Can't help myself when I see people struggling and one injury away (person or caregiver) from disaster. There are products to let a person "help themselves" as much as possible to maintain/improve their strength and abilities- even for people with little/no leg strength to independently do bed transfers and repositioning in bed. A "liftchair for the toilet" that lifts/tilts a person forward and a caregiver just swings a person into the wheelchair. Plus lots of other things that would help- check out AbleData. I invent and handle products to help people but can't ID myself. My specialty is bed area products- can be found here or at AbleData.
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Thank you all for your responses; will keep you posted as to how things work out!
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I understand you are the daughter in law and the primary caregiver and MIL need to accept the fact that a lift is needed to keep him in his home. The hoyer lift is most frequently used and medicare will pay for it. However, I liked the voyger lift better. It does require placement of a 6 to 8 foot ceiling piece being installed to hold the patient but it works quite well. My dad also needed to be convinced the lift would hold him --I had his 6'4'' nephew use the lift to prove it held the nephew and would hold them.
I generally think a lift is safer for the patient and the caregiver. Lifts aren't cheap if not paid for by medicare so the family may need to invest in the lift but
check out craigs list or ebay--they do become available from time to time.

Elizabeth
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I mentioned the lift to my SIL who is the primary care coordinator and her concern is that my FIL may not be able to adjust to the lift. New things seem to confuse him but she says she will check into it. It still needs to get the stamp of approval from my MIL. I agree with everyone, there just aren't many options left and the lift seems to be the answer for everyone's safety. Thanks.
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You need to get a lift. Check out the voyger lifts, I had one in the bedroom ceiling and in the living room. A battery is charged and placed in an overhead sling and lifts the patient safely from their wheel chair to the bed -recline chair etc. You can get hoyer slings to use with this type of lift and they have them for different size patients. My father was 6'2'' at his prime but I could move him alone with this voyger lift.
Getting him on and off a bedside commode may be more work than its worth. I would suggest using a urinal, and using depends type product or a bed pan for bowl movements. They do have slings with holes for tolieting but for one person this can be problematic.
But if he has upper body strength you can use a variety of transfer boards(beasley boards) etc. These work with a drop arm beside commode which allows the person to move from the bed to the commode and then back to bed for bowl movements. However, at 101years (God Bless him) he may lack the strength to use his arms to move his body. My dad
at 93 could use transfer boards in the morning but by early afternoon he lacked the strength to do it.

Get your aides or companions schooled in using the lift safely and you may need to employ 2 aides for periods of time when a family member isn't available in the home to assist. I used 2 aides for my dad when I was working outside the home. I did manage him alone when I was home but I didn't feel my one aide could do transfers alone.

Good luck it is amazing that a man lives to 101 yrs generally that is an area for the ladies:).
Elizabeth
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Thanks for your input. Problem is, my FIL is a large man - he's heavier than all his caregivers so this only adds to the already difficult situation. I don't believe any of the day caregivers have had any formal training; the night one has and her shoulders are starting to bother her. Such a difficult thing to see happening:-((((
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I have seen a daughter (caregiver) of a customer of mine (I'm a hairdresser) move her Mom out of bed to the seat that goes over the toilet ( I don't know the name for this is, it has rails and handles and it's just a higher seat above toilet) and what she does is, she wraps her Mom's hands around her neck , like they are hugging sort of, so the daughters shoulders are really just supporting her Mom's upper arms which are lifeless also, then she wraps her own arms around her Mom's back not tight but tight enough, then moves her Mom into sitting position, still in bed, still holding her, then moves her by mostly sliding her gently into her wheelchair which she has ready and next to the bed arm of wheelchair off, then does the same hold to move her from wheelchair to toilet chair. I must add that her Mom is quite light and the daughter is small as well and a great caregiver and honestly I don't know how she does it but it works. I must also say that I think she uses her heart not her muscles or mind. In other words I think she'd have it harder to take out the trash. Nobody loves that it's heavy and stinks. It's not good for anyone to sit in bed all day so any movement or sitting up is good. I just found out because my brother is in the hospital, that laying down to much could cause lungs to collapse.
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They do have a family room which hasn't been used in years as there are 2 stairs to be navigated so that's been a deterrent. Maybe a ramp could be built so his wheel-chair wouldn't be a problem. They also have a living room which could be converted so guess there are options. I have to be careful though as I'm the DIL and have to tread carefully!
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I did private duty for awhile and this persons house was very small the Bedrooms almost no space except a bed. This person required a lift . It just so happens they had a family room built on years ago. I suggested that we move the patient to this room. I worked really well for the equipment and a very large family plus there was enough space for his wife to have bed to be near by her husband. Maybe if you have another room thats larger?
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I had mentioned that to my MIL but she says they are too big. I used to work in a hospital so I am somewhat familiar with them. Their house is small and I don't knowif there is enough room on the side of the bed for a lift to fit; may also be the same situation for the bathroom. Sad to think of where all this might go. Thanks for your suggestion and may try to suggest that again. There might be different sized Hoyer Lifts too.....actually I think there are as they would need different ones for different patient weights. Happy Thanksgiving.
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My suggestion would be using HOYERLIFT that you could get this from medical supplyer, but you will need from your FIL's Dr's order. Make sure someone should give you the training before use it.
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