FIL's legs don't work - how to help him transfer from bed, wheelchair, toilet?

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My FIL's legs simply don't work anymore. They have 24/7 caregivers but it is getting to the point where they can't manage him. He has a pole at the bedside as well as in the bathroom but he is still slipping to the floor even with assistance from the caregivers. Is there anything else that can be done other than having him be bedridden? He is wheelchair bound otherwise.

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Note - I've used a Hoyer lift - in a very small room - it takes a bit of time to get used to it, but there are two prongs on the bottom which can slide under a bed, then you pull it out again, doesn't take much more width than the lift. And, there is less "getting used to it" than you might think, in terms of physical experience: you position them on a sling, which you put under them, just as you would put any mat under them. Then when you pump the lever, they gradually lift up, almost sitting up in the lift - and they are still over their own bed. No danger. Only when you and they know they are balanced and all is secure and comfortable, do you then move back away from the bed, so they are then over open air, to the transfer point. It takes practice, but I found it a lot easier than I would think, by looking at it. Navigating is like moving a grocery cart. :)
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If a person has no strength left then a sling (using a Hoyer or a lift system) is the only option left but I hate to see that happen- once a person stops using their own muscles their remaining strength quickly disappears. My area of expertise is mobility problems- please contact me thru my website and I can make some recommendations after I gather some additional information.
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I'll have to ask my MIL if she thinks my FIL would be able to adjust to using some sort of equipment. He does have some dementia and "new" things tend to confuse him. Also, when he needs to go to the bathroom he needs to get there as quickly as possible and I'm not sure that there would be enough time for him to use a lift. It's not an easy situation but do appreciate everyone's input.
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Not flexible enough? I know of a lot of products that might provide help but we would have to discuss his abilities in greater detail. I could offer suggestions if you contact me thru the website listed on my profile.
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Thanks for your response. They tried a hoyer lift but he's not flexible enough to use it.
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Alot of medical supply stores will rent the lifts on a monthly basis - that is a good way to try it out.
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Can't help myself when I see people struggling and one injury away (person or caregiver) from disaster. There are products to let a person "help themselves" as much as possible to maintain/improve their strength and abilities- even for people with little/no leg strength to independently do bed transfers and repositioning in bed. A "liftchair for the toilet" that lifts/tilts a person forward and a caregiver just swings a person into the wheelchair. Plus lots of other things that would help- check out AbleData. I invent and handle products to help people but can't ID myself. My specialty is bed area products- can be found here or at AbleData.
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Thank you all for your responses; will keep you posted as to how things work out!
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I understand you are the daughter in law and the primary caregiver and MIL need to accept the fact that a lift is needed to keep him in his home. The hoyer lift is most frequently used and medicare will pay for it. However, I liked the voyger lift better. It does require placement of a 6 to 8 foot ceiling piece being installed to hold the patient but it works quite well. My dad also needed to be convinced the lift would hold him --I had his 6'4'' nephew use the lift to prove it held the nephew and would hold them.
I generally think a lift is safer for the patient and the caregiver. Lifts aren't cheap if not paid for by medicare so the family may need to invest in the lift but
check out craigs list or ebay--they do become available from time to time.

Elizabeth
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I mentioned the lift to my SIL who is the primary care coordinator and her concern is that my FIL may not be able to adjust to the lift. New things seem to confuse him but she says she will check into it. It still needs to get the stamp of approval from my MIL. I agree with everyone, there just aren't many options left and the lift seems to be the answer for everyone's safety. Thanks.
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