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I have a friend who is 45 years old. Any ideas?

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Good answers here. I had a cat that was depressed after losing an eye. One day when he was outside with me, he caught a chipmunk and his demeanor changed when he discovered he was still a mighty hunter! (Chipmunk released unharmed.) Help your friend discover life goes on.
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She should check into updates on eye surgery
as there may be advances that she's not aware of.
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You don't say anything about your friends condition or the severity of her condition. My mother lived with glaucoma for 43 years. Surgery is available and using eye drops daily is really nothing so I am wondering if your friends vision is very limited. I think it is just like everything else we get depressed over our circumstances and we have to get busy and do something we enjoy to get past where we are. If there vision is limited then maybe they would enjoy books on tape or hearing music or even if they cannot see well, just knowing they are going out any place could turn out to be good. Take them on a picnic or to church. Encourage them to make sure to keep up with all medications and treatments.
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Jemaine....while my DH does not have glaucoma, he is deaf and has to be feed, medicated and watered through a tube. He also has metasticized cancer but is also a "glass half empty" type. Hopefully your friend isn't like this as it is nearly impossible to "enlighten" a naysayer. Tell your friend that if she is smart, she can prepare . I was quite pleased to see all the info about the surgery for glaucoma. It's exciting if it is available to her. Also tell her that in the long run she is luckier than a lot of people in that she can better adjust to blindness being young instead of being in her 70's or 80's. I wish you both a lot of success. Sounds like you are a good friend.......that's invaluable!
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Early detection is important and a skilled glaucoma specialist is too. Staying on top of your treatments is also very important as is knowledge about the disease. Medical technology has come a long way and there are many advances in the treatment of glaucoma.
That said, My mother was diagnosed in her 60's but thought the doctor was crazy because she could see just fine, until she couldn't. I don't know how advanced your friends glaucoma is, but it's smart to begin preparing for the worst. If that can be done and remain positive. My mother was a "the glass is half empty" person. Doom and gloom and fearful. Trying to get her to remain positive wasn't working. Trying to get her to prepare her home didn't work. So your friends character is very important and if she isn't normally a happy, positive person then you have your work cut out for you. Antidepressants help.
A councilor for the blind once told me that going blind can be a bump in the road for some. They learn to over come and deal with it. They remain active and productive. With all the helpful agencies for the blind and gadgets designed for the vision impaired, it's hard not to stay active. But for some going blind is the end of the road. Like my mom, who uses being blind as an excuse to not do anything.
Good luck! She's lucky to have a friend like you.
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Is your friend not a candidate for surgery?
This is something that in most cases is easily treatable and should be covered by insurance.
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Try to comfort your friend by sharing positive stories about successful operations of patients with glaucoma
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Recent advances in glaucoma include quick out patient eye surgery which has been very helpful, plus no more daily eye drops.   Have your friend look into this.
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