What is a 'healthy' room temperature for a 90 year old woman?

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My MIL's apt is connected to our home - separate heat - separate thermostats - THANK GOODNESS! Hubby installed a thermometer so that we can monitor the temp in her apt. Twice in the last week we have found her living room temerature VERY high. Once it was 90 and was 90 all night long. Just now I checked because I took something in to give to her and I could barely breathe. The temp was 86. She says she was just getting 'comfortable' and thinking how good it felt.

Are these temperatures 'healthy?' Could they be dangerous? What about dehydration? It is a struggle to get fluids into her as it is. Should we let her doctor know about this?

I gave her a Snugli but she refuses to use a throw - the Snugli is in a plastic bag next to her chair. She would rather turn up the heat.

Answers? Anyone? THE SAGA CONTINUES....................

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We recently had an in service on the dangers of turning the heat on too high with the elderly . This increases dehydration, increases bacteria growth or illness such as staff, flu colds and fungus growth. Especially if the elerly are in places such as ALF or long term care in can double the risk. We are asked to explain to the resident anything above 75 is a danger zone but respect the patients rights too.
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Thank you for your input. I guess we will need to stay in our room to be comfortable and come out for certain tasks. Our area is chilly outside in the winter but rarely freezing, so we've never had to crank the heat up too much. Mom doesn't have good circulation so nothing will change with her, I guess.
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Usually my boss and I [both seniors] have had a thermostat war in the office until I came up with the idea off closing off the force air vents in the ceiling in my office as I am on the sunny side of the building, and keeping the vents in his office wide open. So now I find if he ups the heat to 74 it is still comfortable of me.

Now that I am older, I have noticed if I don't move about much in the office or at home, I need to crank up the heat a bit. I know that was the issue with my Mom [98] when she lived in the house she shared with my Dad, who tend to move moving about more.
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Granny, I sympathise with your mom 68 is way too cold for me! I do try to keep the furnace set to 72 - 74 in the winter though simply to be environmentally responsible and to save on my gas bill. You could probably bundle her up like an Eskimo and she would still feel cold, older people often have poor circulation and are unable to regulate their body temp as well as when they were younger. There are people who like it cold and people who like it hot, unfortunately compromise usually means everyone end up unhappy.
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If you are dealing with zero outside, 74 inside will be very dry and hard on the respiratory system. Add a humidifier if safe to do so.
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We're having a tough time with temperature because we are living with my mother to care for her. We like it no more than 68F and she wants it around 75+F (feels like 80F!). We've started "living" in our room so we can crack the window for oxygen!! She refuses to try any silk under layers, although we have her in an electric blanket & throws all day. What can be done??!!
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Between the ages of 90 - 98, Mom was in Independent living. She kept her thermostat at 82-85 degrees and wore a long sleeve blouse and blazer over that. (I had to wear layers and strip down when I visited.)
I think it depends on how much "fat padding" they have. Mom was 90 lbs soaking wet - not an ounce of fat on her, so she was always cold. She had to have the temperature higher. Maybe someone with more "insulation" wouldn't need the temperature up so high. We didn't worry about bacteria growth because the temp was higher. It was more dangerous for Mom to shiver and have her internal temperature drop because of her inability to retain body heat.
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with all of the above and it being unhealthy with also rapid growth of bacteria and fungus. My girlfriends grandmother dont take showers :( what about that?? and shes sick with a strep throat which now i have . im needing to leave but im still concerned for this lady . she hardly eats but once a day very small portion , she drings little water a day
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My mother hates to use the bathroom, so she drinks maybe 18-20 oz of fluid a day.. So, she is ALWAYS dehydrated. Her place is stifling--around 85 year round. If I go to visit or clean it's so hot I am dripping with sweat within minutes--HOWEVER, this is how she has always been, our family home was always hot.
At this point in her life, she just gets what she wants. I am not even going to bring up a humidifier! Her place is so hoarded, and she is not capable of filling a humidifier anyway.
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Do Not Incubate. Though the elderly can be cold there are options beside the "
stat". Once a room temp gets to high ( where I work over 80 is against policy) it can start to incubate germs. That is why you often feel like a healthcare facility is always chilly. Warm blankets, arm warmers, etc. do help. We have volunteers who make us arm warmers a nd boy the patients really love them. Not cumbersome but effective. Being aware that a room too warm can cause problems is step one. A light electric blanket for short periods of time is an option but use caution and never leave an elderly patient alone while using an elec. blanket.. Best of luck. The heat issue is always controversial.
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