My Mom recently fell in her nursing home. She told me that one of the health workers came into her room to measure the bruises. Why?

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My mom first claimed she tripped over the end table. Then she said she tripped on her walker and slid under the bed and bruised her legs on the hard bottom of the bed. A week later when I visited her a nurse came in and said that my mom said she had fallen again. But the story was so similar to her previous one that we think she might just be confused. I think that they may just be measuring her bruises so that if my mom says she fell in the future they can compare the bruises to see if they are new or not. Does anyone out there have any thoughts on this?

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Gershwin, in dealing with the staff at mom's NH, I find that the trick is making sure that you're asking the right staff member. Some aides and nurses will become defensive when asked almost anything, but sometimes if you know that about them, adopting an "awful shucks I'm new at this" posture helps them see that you're not looking for evidence for a lawsuit , just some information. For general information, the director of social work can get you answers from everyone. Director of Nursing and Director of Rehab are slso friends to cultivate.

When mom is concerned about and issue, like why someone is measuring her bruises, I make sn impressive note in my date book or on my phone and tell her "I'll check on that for you, Mom"
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Gershun, you should definitely spare the staff's feelings. That is even more important than bringing cookies! But I'm pretty confident you can ask for information without hurting anyone's feelings!
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Yes cookies are important!!!! Ha, ha....You are right though in what you say ba8alou. My mom is convinced she lives above a mall. I've learned to just go with it.

But I will start asking more questions when I visit. I've found the staff where my mom is are ultra sensitive though and I almost find myself trying to spare their feelings. Ridiculous I know. I guess my mom brought me up too good.
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My mom's NH always measures bruises, sores, etc. It helps them chart progress in healing and what was there on a particular date.

Not to cast any aspersions on your mom's reporting, but if she has dementia, you want to confirm what she's telling you with staff. My mom often reports what's going on in a distorted way, i.e., if there are men with suits walking down the hallway, the facility has been sold and there is a union coming in to take over. Sometimes folks with dementia grab hold of a fact and run with it. It's so hard to figure out what is true and what is confabulation. the only solution that I see is for family to be around ALOT. Not caregiving, but being present, asking polite questions, attending care meetings, bringing cookies (very important) and finding out HOW things are done.
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I worked a brief stint in a NH/rehab center and on admission a skin assessment was a big part of the admission,if any bruises ,cut ,scrapes were seen actual pictures would be taken, of course written consent from patient and/or guardian was obtained to do this and we explained it gave us a baseline on what their skin condition was on admission,especially if they were admitted with bedsore already started, we not only took pictures of those but also got measurements,this gives a baseline to see if they are improving, was also protection agains being accused of abuse or neglect if these were proven to be their on admission.But yes , anything like a bruise, especially since so many seniors are on anticoagulents they can bruise worse than others, we documented size, color ,shape ,any redness ,tenderness, swelling,needed to know if we were making progress or not.
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My thought is to ask the director of nursing why bruises are measured. Then you'd know.
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