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My sister is not wanting to hire anyone to come once or twice a week for fear of losing her inheritance.

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I agree with Jeanne. Plus, if you go right ahead, hire the aide as your father wishes, and pay the aide with your father's money... well. What's she gonna do about it? Document it properly - receipts, invoices, care agreements - and tell her "bite me."

Just one wrinkle. I assume your sister is not saying "you're not spending his money on care for him - I want it all" is she? So what reasons does she give for objecting to this apparently very sensible plan? Has she been listening to nasty stories about aides in people's homes, or had a bad experience with one, or something?
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Peggyas, having multiple people as POA often results in conflicts and in nothing getting done. It is generally a mistake to assign the role that way. But it is what it is.

But in this particular case, it is pretty straight forward. Dad wants the aid. Dad gets the aid. Unless he has been declared incompetent to make decisions by a court, and unless one of you has guardianship, it is your duty as POA to act according to his wishes. If he becomes unable to express those wishes, that is a different situation. But you can't not hire an aid for him just because not everyone agrees.
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My opinion: people make quite a mistake when they presume taking care of a parent has to do with inheritance. Typically, I think that is the first rationalization you hear. It is meant to put you off guard, however the issue is about financial security with regards to finances and healthcare management.

In-home care is a great choice if can navigate to that as a first line of defense. Often, due to comments like inheritance and many, many other comments being a distraction it gets in the way of what matters: getting qualified help, from anyone who is licensed, LPN, RN, doctor, other that can assist the family in being able to help your father. The authority in my opinion comes from another licensed person, such as primary doctor who can order/request, for example, basic care, weekly, bi-weekly, monthly. If parent is well enough to communicate to doctor/other that they do not need it, then that representative tends to hesitate, because it is about comfort and seeing a need medically. If it is about just making other family members feel comfortable without much facts, then that can place the primary doctor on the fence as to what direction to take. I would think reviewing what the words 'health care agent' entails, because there are a lot of terms in this day and age with different documents, legal, financial, and medical, and often getting everyone on same page, or major players, i.e. parent, doctor, main caregiver to start a new program, try it out is worth the effort. Good luck!
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My dad has agreed to having an aid come. She has actually worked taking care of him for about 5 times so far. He really likes her and enjoys her company.
My oldest sister lives in another state but has helped out by staying for several weeks at a time. But she has not been able to come for the past two months. My other sister and I take turns but always changes the schedule that we make up for the month. I just wanted one full day a week that I could count on .
All three sister have POA's but I am the heath care agent also. My older sister agrees with me on hiring someone at least once a week. It really a $ issue but only for the one sister. My dad can afford it with no problem.
So do I being the health care agent have the right to hire an aid for that one day a week?
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Your sister is being selfish. His money should be for his care first and if there is anything left over for you two to inherit.
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I'm interpreting that you have Health Care Power of Attorney and your sister has Financial Power Power of Attorney. If this is true, then no, you can't hire someone and use your Father's money.
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Yes, but getting dad to be receptive and cooperative is another matter entirely. Perhaps sis would like to volunteer to care for him a couple of times a week? Then the money would not need to be spent. Are you providing the care otherwise? You should be paid if that is the case. You need a care agreement first, though.

And he should pay for the care, not you.
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