Health advice for senior women?

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As women's start growing older, they find it tough to carry out daily activities with ease. This is because of their aging as well as weak body. Can anyone advice some healthy activities or tips that a senior lady must perform to stay fit ?

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My late parents use to walk 2 miles per day, come rain or shine. I really believed that helped them live into their mid to late 90's, plus healthy eating.

My boss is in his early 80's and can run circles around guys half his age. He took up squash playing at a young age and worked himself into being a pro and squash teacher.... while continuing to run a family business which he still has active today. Now a days he plays 18 holes of golf at least once a week.
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Company. Human companionship. Taking care of plants, cooking for yourself for as long as possible rather than being pushed into accepting meals on wheels simply because they are offered. Grandchildren. Animals. Rather than passive TV watching, computers would be preferable since computer use (as I am doing now) is active. My mom enjoyed folk dancing right into her 80's.

Knitting might be difficult for some but it is proven to be extremely good to keep the mind sharp.

Quitting smoking, although I do not think a person should be forced nor nagged, which will only cause fights and tension.

I recently noted that an 87-year-old woman completed a 5k road race on Thanksgiving. She didn't win, but I believe came in first for her age group! I am approaching my senior years myself and I still run. I'm capable of 10k, but I don't think I'm ready to race that distance. 5k for now. Days prior to Thanksgiving I caught a cold and had to cancel. Drat. I didn't start running till I was 40.

It is NEVER too late, and I plan to sign up for another in a few weeks and kick a**.
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Even in facilities, there are 'exercise' programs. The one I am familiar with does sessions for those in wheelchairs.I have also watched a number of seniors go through physical therapy. Lot's of movements to keep them moving! Arms up to reach for the sky; arms out and back like rowing a boat; wiggling fingers, wrists, etc; shoulder shrugs; lifting legs while sitting as if marching in place; rolling feet, ankles, toes; extending the legs til they are (almost) parallel with seat of chair; rotate neck; etc. etc. As the others said, keep them moving! For those 'less mobile' even having the senior standing in place (can be holding on to the back of a strong chair or walker) can help build the stamina and strength in the legs.
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Thank you people for taking out time and replying to my post with helpful as well as informative advice of yours. I agree with most of you that exercising is a great way to stay fit at such an older age. Looking forward to more replies.
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There's an ad on TV that uses "a body in motion stays in motion ... " for an arthritis treatment. I think they're right .. about both body AND mind. The best advice I can think of for keeping the ills of aging at bay is to stay involved with your life ... or in our cases, keeping our loved ones involved with their own life. Learn what interests them and feed it: do they like working in the garden, around the house? social activities? being responsible for taking care of something (be it a person, pet or laundry or shopping)? doing puzzles or crosswords? reading? ... you get the gist. When/if they become no longer physically capable of something, try to find a reasonable alternative.

I turn everything we do into an 'opportunity' for some kind of exercise. While we're getting dressed, we do memory exercises (what day is it? where are you? name your relatives .... SD takes most of these first memories first, and repetition helps keep it at bay); I try to be a coach, instead of being the doer: doing the stuff herself (getting dressed, moving, standing, walking), with me as a guide or her spotter, helps keep her motivated and physically stronger.

We're dealing with post-stroke issues (paralyzed right side), old spinal and hip injuries and surgeries (arthritis-related), recurrent UTIs (prolapsed rectum and partially paralytic bladder) and incontinence, dementia (I really hate that word .. why haven't we come up with something more dignified??). We focus on her quality of life: making it comfortable ... and fun! We find ways to laugh, as often as possible, keep her occupied with as many challenges as she can handle, both physically and mentally.
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My perspective you can appoint home health care provider .Home care provider offers a patient personal care services such as assistance with daily life activities such as eating, toileting, bathing, grooming, transfers, and mobility as required.
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I am obviously not a health expert but I have found through my own experiences and with my Mother and an elderly neighbor whom I have become very close to. Exercise is what keeps you moving. Just as much as you can. Walking, dancing, whatever you can do to keep limber. Stretching is the absolute must. Every day.
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My mother-in-law is 88 yrs and has survived 2 broken hips. The ONLY reason she came thru the rehab at her age and can still walk, is her absolute determination to WALK. I think walking is the best exercise for most people, let alone old people. She uses a walker now and lives in asst. living, but she gets herself out of her chair off and on all throughout the day, and takes a stroll down the halls.
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