I have POA for my Mom, but banks are not accepting my legal forms. Any advice?

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We need to keep her in her home, she need funds for her care. RE financing her home is a way to help, but The banks are not accepting my legal form? Any suggestion i really dont want to get guardianship if i don't have too.

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Unfortunately, there are frequently problems with certain banks recognizing the validity of a Durable Power of Attorney. On the private email listserv subscribed to by elder law attorneys across the U.S. there were often pleas of exasperation from attorneys trying to get their DPOA recognized by certain banks, and other attorneys saying they avoid such and such bank for that reason but have never had trouble with so and so bank.
Since the policies of the various banks may change over time, I cannot give specific names, but simply wanted to point out that there may not be anything missing from your document, it may simply be a troublesome bank.

My suggestion is to have the attorney who drafted the document call over to an executive at that bank branch to throw a little weight around. If you cannot use that attorney for some reason, it may be cost effective to pay a different attorney to make the call; certainly it would be cheaper and less invasive to family privacy than going through the court procedure of obtaining a guardianship or conservatorship.
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Ask them what form they want. You need a Durable Power of Attorney. Not just a POA. The bank might have a specific form. Can she sign a new form? You need to get your name on the account and get a POD (payable on death) for the account so you can access her friends after she passes so you can pay for her expenses. You may need to ask to speak to someone higher up at the bank because the person you were talking to mighr not even understand what a power of attorney is. You may have enough authority with the POA YOU HAVE TO SIGN THE POA THEY WANT. There is some software called WillMaker that has several legal forms on it that you need. You install the software and answer the questions and it prints out wills living wills durable power of attorney and several other forms.The software cost about $35. You can get it on eBay or Amazon. Everything is a struggle. You have to learn to not take no for an answer. Keep moving up the chain at the bank until you find someone who is competent. God Bless you.
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BOA was a huge pain in the a**, BTW. I finally got relief by going to another office with someone who knew what they were talking about : (
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Yes some banks and investment entities want to see their client in person, and have them sign in their presence, when allowing another person to have control of their client's entire savings. That is a good practice generally. If they just let someone with a piece of paper come in and demand to be in charge, I would expect there to be some hesitation. For my parent's accounts at USBank, WellsFargo, Hartford, and a couple others, they all had their own in-house forms, all different. Some needed to be notarized and one even required a medallion signature. If you encounter "trouble", that's a good thing.
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I had similar experience to stargazer. Some entities gave me a problem with the Durable POA. Example: My father is presently in nursing home temporarily for rehab/pt. He cannot stand, cannot pivot into or out of a wheelchair and must be lifted into it with help of 3 attendants, he is in the late stage of dementia and would have absolutely no idea what he is signing and is in no mental state to possibly make any decisions -- he would agree to anything at this point in his condition. I would not ever feel comfortable or "right" having him sign anything, since he no longer has any semblance of free will. But, even more ridiculous is that the DMV expected him to physically come into the office to have his picture taken and sign for a NYS non-driver id card, even after I explained his condition repeatedly and it would entail an involved and expensive task to get him there and back -- an ambulette and an aide, and an operation of monumental proportions to bring him through a mall and into a DMV office to sign his name. Further, the Toyota dealer I had been working with in one town to lease a new car in my father's name (all material items are in his name) insisted that their policy is to not accept POA for anything. Disheartened, I took a chance at a Toyota dealer in a bigger city and with a greater track-record and rating, and they gave me no trouble about the POA at all -- and a MUCH better deal. It's worth not taking no for an answer until after you've tested other possibilities.
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Thank you ... with research i looked deeply into her Living will and I am named Trustee and as the Trustee there is a POA form all it needs is her Dr. to fill out a certification that my mom is unable to take care of her finances and heath issues. So now is what i am working on . Thank you all for your answers
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They don't have to accept the DPOA; not accepting totally is a CYA for them. I've found that if you go into a local branch, the teller will not accept anything and neither will the branch officers. BoA = nonstarters for POA acceptance.

You need to go to the main office OR a branch that has a trust department as the officers who work trust understand and can evaluate the DPOA to make sure it complies with state requirements for financial. You need to have your own 2 - ID's too ( 1 is your DL and the other either a passport or something that legally establishes legal residency like voters registration) & dress appropriately and have your act together. Often on-line POA are "springing" and totally useless. For my mom they looked to see that DPOA done by a local attorney with appropriate seals / letterhead / notary details too.
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We had this issue with Chase for FIL's acct- we had a legal POA- the bank has their own form's we needed to have mobile notary come to NH to verify FiL signature. And the bank was okay- they just needed it on their forms for their legal department.
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Here in NYC, Chase bank gave me a very hard time. Also, I got stopped banking while female. Their lawyers misinterpreted the POA and put my brother down as the POA, though he was clearly listed if only upon my death. They fixed it but not before treating me like a criminal trying to steal my mother's money. The bank manager at this bank is a particular snarky individual, but no doubt aided and abetted by obnoxious, suspicious lawyering. If I weren't so tuckered out from caregiving I'd give them the bird and go elsewhere.
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I experienced the same thing from my father's bank. I went to another branch and they accepted my POA.
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