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Reply to Llamalover47
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Riley: An extremely bad infaction of the colon and then some.
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Reply to Llamalover47
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AlvaDeer Jun 16, 2019
But honestly not very "catching" to those who are healthy. This comes of having had treatment with antibiotics or other meds that wiped out the "good bacteria" in the colon while wiping out the bad. You only get C Diff if you are compromised in this way. As nurses we simply used the exact same methods we used with others, gloves and good hand washing. I never knew a nurse to get C-Diff. That's in 40 years of nursing. We had no fear of it other than that it was killing our patients. Not their original disease, but the C-Diff. We did not isolate people with C-Diff.
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What on earth is C. dificile????????????????????????????????/
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Reply to Riley2166
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Oh my,, you should be able to get some in home health care if you need it. I work in an ICU, and many patients have this. And I don't want to think how many people in the general population have it and have no idea at first. We wear gowns and gloves, but I have never seen a hazmat suit for this! We do keep the patients in isolation ( just signs on the door ) and letting visitors know they need to gown and glove up, but that's so they don't take it home or spread it around the ICU. When we leave the room we do soap and water washing of our hands. There are treatments for it ( see other posts) and the best preventative is good handwashing and hygene. Bleach does kill it on surfaces, so make sure you are cleaning surfaces well after use. It is very comman in Nursing Homes, and such. I have been working with it for over 22 years, and I have never gotten it., so just see whats out there.
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Reply to pamzimmrrt
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You'll have to get your physician to sign off on this.
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Reply to Llamalover47
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First off, if you need in home care, more than likely you are going to need dr's order to get it. Talk to the doctor who diagnosed it and ask him if home health will come. (I don't really see why they wouldn't since medical staff have to deal with this issued quite often - it's a matter of protection with gloves, etc).

If home health is something you are doing as private request and private pay, just call the home health company and ask.
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Reply to my2cents
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My 14 year old got c-diff after a terrible infection. (The c-diff is only killed with bleach.) They sent him home. I had 3 younger children at home. We just kept EVERYTHING BLEACHED. No other cleaner will kill it according to his CDC Dr. As for help, I'm not sure why a home health aid wouldn't. They are trained for that. It's all about being diligent.
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Reply to Westsidegirl
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As a nurse I need to tell you please to see a good gastroenterologist and get a referral to someone who does fecal transplant. I have seen it work in days and I have seen people die of C-Diff when their initial disease was well treated and gone. It is common in people with long term or high dose antibiotics, or in persons with autoimmune problems, or cancer treatments. If the medications work for you that is wonderful but it does not for many. I have seen people actually have to go the youtube instruction route to do this at home, believe it or not. And believe it or not it was, though I don't recommend that route, a cure. There is more and more research and whereas there were only a few MDs who did this there are now more. Essentially it is --yup--capsules of someone elses treated poop to give you the normal flora any healthy bowel needs. Anyone who has dealt with C Diff understands the explosive, uncontrollable river it is; you cannot even leave your house. Nor can you hang on to the nutrients needed. You can google information about fecal transfers or fecal transplants easily; there is a lot of information on the internet and almost none in your MDs offices. Joyce Maynard, the author, discussed this when her husband almost died, during his cancer treatments, of the side effects of his C-Diff. It has mad this a now "subject nice folks can discuss out loud" just as Robin Williams death has made Lewy's Bodies Dementia more a household name. Good luck to you. And C-Diff is caused when our own system has no protection of "good bacteria". I was a nurse all my life. While we always gloved, we were never afraid of "catching C-Diff". C-Diff is an over proliferation of something that the normal bowel protects against. Read all you can about it on the internet.
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Reply to AlvaDeer
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Oral vancomycin works very well with c. diff. For more resistant cases fecal implant works. The danger is loss of fluids with the elderly--it's hard enough to get them to drink. The risk is dehydration and all of those complications. Home health workers who care for people with c-diff diarrhea may spread it to other home-health patients as it is highly contagious.
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Reply to cetude
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This website is helpful...
Www.LetsFaceCDiff.com
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Reply to Judysai422
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Don’t panic. This is fairly common.

My daughter had c diff and it was misdiagnosed for quite some time so we didn’t know she had it. She got it in the hospital when she was over treated with (IV) antibiotics for a different illness.

Nurses and doctors treat patients with c diff all day long. You should be able to hire professional home nursing care if you need help.

Initially, I never used any protective clothing or gear because I didn’t know she had it, but it’s a good idea to use disposable gloves. Don’t share the bathroom with others if you have a choice.

I just used household bleach cleaning products (as always) while disinfecting the bathrooms and common areas.

Nobody else at home got it.

Make sure you’re not on too many antibiotics. If you were taking antibiotics for some other illness and picked up c-diff, it likely occurred because the (high dosage) antibiotics wiped out the intestinal “good” bacteria. My daughter didn’t get better until she was finally removed from all the initial antibiotics. I advocated for her after researching the medications. (The doctors wanted to keep her on the previous medications to prevent her from a recurrence of the other illness.)

She was then prescribed a medication to treat the c-diff only-that was effective

Look up the dosages, warnings and interactions of all your medications so that you can actively discuss with your doctor before taking.
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Reply to ACaringDaughter
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By in home care do you mean you have C.diff or the person you are caring for has it.
If you are a caregiver to someone that has C.diff any agency that you hire should have someone that is knowledgeable that can help care for her. It may cost more since they may say they need to send someone specially trained.
If you need a caregiver for yourself same thing would apply.
If you have to go in for treatment (there are treatments such as Fecal
Transplant) then the person you are caring for could go into "respite" for the length of time it would take you to recover.
Or you can hire a caregiver to care for you while you recover at home.

The way your question is worded it is difficult to figure out who has C.diff you or the person you care for.

Anyone that is caring for someone with C.diff should take proper precautions mask, gloves, gown, keeping all supplies in one area then once the C.diff has resolved I would dispose of any supplies that were opened during the course.
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Reply to Grandma1954
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My aunt was home with c-diff and no one could help her. It took a long time for her to get rid of it so it would have been horrible for her to have stayed in that hospital all that time.
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Reply to againx100
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There aren’t many, if any, home health workers who will come out to treat someone with C-diff. They would need to wear gloves and masks, if not full hazmat suits. Most will refuse to help bathe or shower the person.

Can I ask why you aren’t in the hospital, under quarantine and on antibiotics? My husband, also with C-diff, was not released to go home until it was determined he was no longer contagious.
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