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Also, forgot to add, if you will be staying in a hotel, find out what size beds they have and get a waterproof mattress pad for the bed, and a waterproof pad or 2 for the top. We always stayed in a hotel with a guest laundry.
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I believe any long trip made with young children or dementia patients can benefit from a second adult along to help out.

My mom doesn't have dementia and mostly bladder spasm incontinence from her spinal stenosis. We've been able to take a stool, folding walker, disposable chair pad and a towel along and use a handicap stall or a family bathroom to change my mom's incontinence underwear while traveling. In the handicap stall, Mom can usually use the installed handrails to balance while we make the change. When the handrails are not available, the walker in a nice alternative. I place a chair pad on the stool seat and a towel on the floor under and in front of the stool. I pull pants and underwear down enough for Mom to sit on the stool while I take pants and underwear over her feet as needed, then Mom stands while holding to rail or walker while I clean with wipes and pull everything back up. If I have toilet seat covers, we can occasionally change using the toilet instead of the stool. People look at me funny when I carry the stool in/out, but it works...
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NorCalDrew Sep 29, 2018
Thank you, great tips.
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My husband is incontinent and we would travel from Cleveland, Ohio to just outside Cincinnati, a trip of about 5 hours or so. He would wear an overnight brief plus an extra pad. I would also pad the seat where he sat. Since I was unable to change him in a rest area, he was beyond saturated by the time we arrived at our destination. It wasn’t an impossible trip, but it definitely had its challenges. We traveled with a small suitcase filled with his incontinence supplies.

If this person has dementia, it will add to the challenges. They may become confused and anxious as people with dementia don’t understand change of scenery. I’d be quite certain you will be able to handle this before you make any decisions.
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NorCalDrew Sep 29, 2018
Thank you, very helpful.
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