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I’ve always raised my kids based on books like How to Raise a Healthy Child in Spite of Your Doctor. Can you have happier, healthier aging parents if we take more control?

I think many over 70s are much too willing to believe in “expert research” and too timid to take a leap into what can be wonderful adventures in living day by day life the best way they can.

I decided 7 years ago that weighing at least 100 pounds more than I should have was NOT what I wanted to do, so I made up my mind, did the research, prayed, and changed it.

I lost the life long ability to play woodwind instruments, so in spite of the many books (written by people younger than 40) that “expertly” state that serious proficiency on a musical instrument cannot be attained unless one is only single digits old when they start playing, I found myself a wonderful(but incredulous) teacher, bought a horn, and blew my brains out. I’ve achieved about4 years of proficiency in a little over a year, and still relish every minute.

Maybe we listen too quickly when someone says “take it easy”, and means “sit back and get out of the way while I do the fun stuff”, or “have a cup of tea with a tablespoon of sugar and 11 large cookies for a snacks leave the health food to the kids”.

Nope. Life is good. I’m missing some wonderful stuff because of the pandemic, but plans are already moving ahead to do them WHENEVER we finally get a grip on this cursed virus, and trust me I’LL BE THERE, AND BETTER THAN EVER.
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Reply to AnnReid
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For me, lifelong RN, we live too long, not too short. Dr. Dean Edell, radio talk show doctor for many years wrote an entire book called Eat, Drink, and be Merry I think it was called, saying "Do as you please, because whatever you think you are doing to give you extra fun filled years will likely be years more in a facility". So there are MANY thoughts along these lines that come to my own 78 year old mind as the body begins its slow slide toward the inevitable.
For me I have no taste at all for longievity, and in fact I fear it. You should see my elaborate Advanced Directive telling them what they may NOT do to me. We talk too little about these issues.
All of that said, if I as an RN had one piece of advice? Avoid anger. It eats you worse than cancer ever will. Oh, and wait. One more. MOVE! Never stop moving even when it hurts. It will help heal everything from circulation to bone preservation. Get out there and look at the world.
Wish this had been posted in discussion thread. A GREAT subject. Thanks.
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DWinHull Oct 25, 2020
I’ll have to figure out what ‘discussion thread’ is. I’m still trying to find my way around. Great comments! My mom has a DNR. The meds she is on seem to reduce quality of life. I have her going to my doctor now. I convinced him I didn’t want to be on any meds long term. I was willing to make life changes and eat well.
My mom made a comment tonite when I put her pills in front of her. So many! Is this what’s keeping me alive?
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I confess I'm not familiar with "AMA controlled aging", unless you're referring to the overall medical approach, with periodic tests, meds as first choice of treatment, etc.

I'm outspoken on this issue, but I do feel strongly that proven natural remedies, including growing one's own healthy food, are generally better than medicines, other than for specific conditions, but even then, a natural lifestyle complements aging better than reliance on manufactured/produced substances.

As an aside, I was in a grocery store last week looking for the brand of hand sanitizer I've used but can't find now, and noticed a large section of cough treatments...all kinds of treatments, bottles, and more.   Not cheap either.

I hope this doesn't sound arrogant, b'c it's not intended to be, but for me, other than cough drops, herbs heated and inhaled have cleared my nasal passages and throat for decades.    Why would I want concocted "remedies" that cost far more than the cost of seed packets?   And don't forget any preservatives in the mixture.

One of the more progressive hospitals in the area has adopted this approach in its pharmacy, kitchen, and overall treatment.   Vegetables (and I believe herbs) are grown organically in the greenhouse on the hospital grounds, used in the hospital, and sold at a Farmer's Market weekly.

The "pharmacy" is an enticing, fragrant, refuge from the chain pharmacies.    I can clear my sinuses just by strolling through the pharmacy!   The medical complex is more like a small city; it's lovely and relaxing.

Take a virtual stroll through the greenhouse; have you ever seen a hospital with this kind of food source?

https://www.youtube.com/embed/_R9e_JbDLO8

I would agree that more involvement with our parents could make their aging experience better.   I learned so much in doing so, not only about them personally but how to approach problem solving, interaction, prevention and remediation.   It was really a life experience, certainly not always pleasant, but definitely bonding.    It provided insights that couldn't be captured in books.  

And through that experience I realized even more how much doctors are inclined to first prescribe something unnatural (i.e., concocted solutions) as opposed to healthy eating of organic foods.   This was so disappointing, to visit a doctor and be told to buy all sorts of concocted, expensive treatments instead of being advised which foods have the needed minerals and vitamins, and which activities are appropriate for specific conditions.

On the subject of food, I have to bring in the Big Agra producers, using so much pesticide and chemicals to maintain the massive harvests that provide their revenue, while exposing not only consumers but migrant workers to chemicals.  

I think as a nation, the bigger concept of food production has been lost as Big Agra dominates and controls what we can buy.   We need to take back food production, grow as much as we reasonably can, freeze, dry or can it, and segue into a better lifestyle.

And this is an area in which aging parents can bond and interact; this is a spirit reinforcing activity, and can create and strengthen bonds from one generation to the next.  

DW, this is an excellent topic.   Thanks for raising it.
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DWinHull Oct 26, 2020
Yes, you understood where I was going with that — Meds and other intrusive treatments. I do have to sneak greens into my mother’s diet. She has all of a sudden decided she doesn’t like vegetables. I’ll have to get creative. She will drink a smoothie. She loves looking at my garden so I’ll have to get her to help me do starter plants next year. If she grows it maybe she will eat it.
I took her to an acupuncturist for her neuropathy. I was allowed to stay in the room with her. It was even relaxing for me in the peaceful treatment room. It was a good bonding experience too.
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I see many overmedicated seniors. We have a doctor in an adjoining town that is well known for over medicating older folks.
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DWinHull Oct 26, 2020
I suppose it could be the generation. Taking a pill was a quick fix and they believed everything the doctor told them.
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I believe so! My mom cut way back on my grandmother’s meds (things that made her dizzy or sleepy). She fell a lot less and was more alert. DIET is the biggest issue.
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DWinHull Oct 26, 2020
Agreed! The side effects are a true concern. Besides sleeping so much she says she has crazy dreams that seem real. She wakes up so disoriented and that contributes to the fall risk when getting up to use the commode.
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