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I know CBD products work well in some areas. I know as a consumer we should be careful where it is purchased. It isn’t regulated as well as it should be.


I do not not have any personal experience so I am reaching out to the forum. Should I bring it up to her neurologist?

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True, Alva.

I saw this thing on television awhile back with elderly people who were curious about marijuana in Colorado. At first they felt awkward. Then they started buying and using the CBD products because they were helpful with arthritis and other issues.
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My former brother in law has severe Parkinson's. Uses edible marijuana. Seems to have helped some. His doctor took him off some meds.
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Thanks Travel2. Appreciate the feedback.
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It is unlikely that a doctor is going to be on board with anything that he isn't writing a prescription for.

My mom is on CBD, not for Parkinson's but for pain. Do some research. I suggest organic, full spectrum, etc. Ask the person working at your local health food store or food co-op for a recommendation. The lady at our local shop said that one trick with CBD is to make sure you take enough. One guy, about 300 lbs, complained that it was not working for him and she pointed out that he was taking a small amount which could not give him any relief. He upped his dose and received benefit from it.

It helps my mom's pain. When she remembers to take it.
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Good to know. But should I mention it to her doctor to get his opinion?
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FDA has approved many drugs that have since been pulled off the shelves. Before taking any, ANY drug, know what you are getting yourself into. Do your research. Do not rely on the FDA because they are understaffed and the file drawer effect happens there too (positive results bias).

Find yourself an Eastern Medicine practitioner or registered dietician or someone whose open-minded and will work with you. With most diseases, there is no magic bullet and CBD oil is not one either.

My neighbor who was going through severe menopause uses CBD oil and she looks so much better. She puts a few drops under her tongue at night at bedtime and she's not fatigued nor sweating profusely.
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Geaton777 Jul 2019
She can't rely on the FDA for info about supplements as that is not their purview. CBD oil is considered a food supplement. The FDA pulls pharmaceuticals and devices off the market when the passage of time and usage reveals problems that initial clinical studies didn't. The FDA is criticized for not getting drugs to consumers fast enough. It's a no-win situation. As far as finding a "reputable" maker, practitioner, supplier: since it's efficacy, purity, dosage consistency is not proven, there is no such thing as "reputable", only "opinion" and subjective experiences of individuals. Sorry, I know this isn't a popular thing to express and I'm not blindly defending "big pharma" ,but "big supplement" is a for-profit industry and is the wild west of self medication. Do you know why "big supplement" hasn't "pulled" any products off the shelves? Because there's no oversight.
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I have worked in the Med-tech related sector for years but I don't benefit from the sale of either pharmaceuticals or supplements. Here's what I've learned: CBD oil is a supplement. Supplements are NOT really regulated by an independent, qualified 3rd party (like the FDA). If a product is being "regulated" by its own maker or within the supplement industry, this is mostly worthless regulation. This means that supplements:
1) can't make a statement of effectiveness (because there's no real clinical, peer-reviewed proof that it works, like all FDA-approved drugs need to do)
2) can be made in someone's basement, garage, porch, dirty kitchen or any other unsanitary place, unlike real pharmaceuticals. Just because the product has a nice label and official bottle means nothing. (it may contain CBD, but it may also contain dirt, hair, crumbs, literally anything else besides CBD and you'd never know).
3) doses are not necessarily consistent in each capsule, bottle. It is not guaranteed (even capsules all from the same bottle or one bottle of oil to the next from same maker)
4) purity of content is not guaranteed (meaning maker could be thinning the product with other oils or other substances to stretch the batch and make more money. It may contain no CBD at all but you'd never know it. It could also contain THC which would be a big problem)

CBD oil hasn't been in use long enough to know what long-term or adverse permanent effects it may have on people. People who take it today ARE the guinea pigs for tomorrow's research.

The "placebo effect" accounts for 20% of efficacy (because one expects it to work, then one believes it is working). This is a proven scientific phenomenon. So knowing all this, please temper your decision and expectations. If your LO thinks it will work and they benefit from the 20% Placebo Effect, then it has some limited value. But definitely tell the neurologist if she is taking it! Just because something is "natural" doesn't mean it is not a chemical -- it still is a chemical and interacts with other chemicals/medications. Her neurologist/pharmacist can't help you if they don't have all her accurate information.
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AlvaDeer Jul 2019
It's excellent explanation above there, and I think also know that there are in different size cities different places to buy this and you should check it out. They will have reputable and knowledgable people working who can recommend companies they trust. I would not buy this online, unless you have good information. Do understand that it is "not legal" federally, because while you can get it "with or without THC " it often still has traces of that when tested, hence is illegal on airplanes, and anywhere else where federal law trumps State. I have seen many people say it cuts down on the anxious picking at skin and etc. and helps with anxiety. Again, this is anecdotal, of course. I cannot image a reason not to try some of the sublingual oil, but I WOULD pass it past the doctor first.
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