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The will my mom has is hand written and signed by two witnesses a it binding in the state of California or does it need to be notorized and do I need a power of attorney

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It totally depends on what state your mother resides in and wrote the holographic will in. Many states recognize them as valid Wills, others like mine do not. Check with an attorney.
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This is the section of the California Probate Code which addresses holographic wills:

http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/cgi-bin/displaycode?section=prob&group=06001-07000&file=6110-6113.

It's a bit confusing, as are most statutes, but hopefully it will help answer your question.

This is probably easier to understand, and briefer:

CALIFORNIA
A Holographic Will is recognized as a valid Will, whether or not witnessed, as long as the signature and material portions of the Will are in the testator's own handwriting. A Holographic Will may be held to be invalid if it does not state the date of the execution and the date cannot be proven. A Holographic Will is also considered invalid if the testator lacked the required mental capacity to execute a Will. (Probate Code Section 6111)

So:

1. Did your mother have "capacity" (i.e., legal clarity, sound mind) to execute the Will?

2. Is it entirely in her handwriting except for the witnesses' signatures?

3. Is it dated?

Your mother should ideally have a financial as well as a health care power of attorney, assuming she's not suffering from dementia which would preclude her making important legal decisions.
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In Nevada, a holographic (handwritten) will doesn't even need to be witnessed or notarized to be valid. I just attended a senior law program on this and POAs for medical issues. I am 100% sure on the holographic will in NV. If you do one though, make sure somebody knows where to find it when the time comes. The POA is different because it is for use before death, and is useless after death. Does your moms will say who she wants to carry out the wishes expressed in the will? A POA won't do any good for that. Call a local elder law attorney for a free phone consultation. Call several. Then you'll know if you need to book an appointment with mom for the attorney. Who actually has the will she drew up?
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P.S. Caregivers are busy people and we aren't always online to answer questions immediately.
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In the State of Texas, yes. But it is always best to one have properly drawn up by an attorney.
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There's nothing wrong with it's being hand-written, as such. But this is a notorious legal danger zone - so if you want to be sure that your mother's will is valid and can be implemented on her passing, then spend a small amount of money and have it drawn up properly by a competent lawyer.

POA is a separate issue. Does your mother still have capacity? Because if she wants to grant you POA then she has to be legally competent to do that. I think you'd better seek professional advice, don't you?
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Not sure. I'd call a lawyer.
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What's the answer to my question
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