How can you handle medications you're allergic to if you have to give them to the person you're taking care of?

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About 2 weeks ago we had to get refills on some of my grandma's meds, and we were out. So, the pharmacy faxed the doctor for more refills. She had ended up switching a couple of her meds, because of the blood results from about a month ago when my grandma went in for a UTI. She takes meds 3 times a day, every 8 hours. Since they switched them, whenever I give her the night ones I start getting dizzy, I start having a little trouble breathing, and I start sneezing. I don't know why. It doesn't happen with her other two medications. Each one she takes 5 pills, all of which are different. Is there anything I can do about this? I can't just not give her her meds, and I don't know which one (or ones) are causing it. I am a "very allergic" person. I have a histamine and chemical sensitivity. Along with asthma gerd, pcos, and allergic to multiple medications.

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When my hubby was on about 30 meds post liver transplant, I gloved up and wore a face mask for so many things--one of them being pill sorting. I put the pills in small containers to with the instructions as to when they were to be taken. I only handled his meds then. I am hyper sensitive to dexamethasone ( a steroid) and he was on it for 3+ months.
Also, I wasn't pregnant, but 2 of my daughters were and one med (I cannot remember its name) was not to even be HANDLED by pregnant women. We played it very, very safe.
We had a transplant pharmacist on call and we called him a few times to help up understand things.
I have developed allergies later in life--I never used to be allergic to anything, now I have allergies to a lot of stuff--nothing life threatening, but annoying.
Call the pharmacist! They know far more about drugs and interractions than the drs do.
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It could be the coating on the pill, each manufacture uses something different. Once the pill is narrowed down, have the pharmacy use a different manufacture of the pill... and keep a note what manufacture to stay away from for future orders. Shellac is used as a coating.

My Mom had issues taking certain pills but not when she used one certain manufacture. Of course, my parents used mail order delivery of their meds so Mom couldn't ask for a certain manufacture. I suggested to Dad that Mom get her pills from the local pharmacy where she would have more control, but my parents said "no" because the pills would cost more. Good grief, they could afford to switch, but refused to do so.... [sigh]. So Mom had to deal with all the side effects.
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I never had allergies until I caregave. I actually developed an allergy to the urine when the patient had a uti. I knew she had one two days before it would show up on the culture. I had to go to an allergist to get tests done to confirm and got medication for it so I would start there. If it is confirmed that you are allergic to medication, you can get an order to get the medications in a bubble wrap to limit your exposure to the medication. If your grandma is on medicaid, you can have a nurse come in to set them up for you, medicare will not pay for it.
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Kaykay, does she get so her Rx's at the same pharmacy? I'd call and talk to the pharmacist (or take a list of her meds into the pharmacy) and tell them what's happening. Maybe they'd know right off the bat which are more likely to cause a reaction.

I'm wondering if bent-nosed tweezers (or something along those lines) would help for picking up the pills? The pharmacist might also be aware of tools for handling meds. They have that thing for counting and scraping them into the jars; i don't think that would help but I wonder if they use something else for more reactive meds?
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Dear KayKay,

Are you able to wear disposal glove and a face mask when giving out the meds? I don't know if this will help with the allergy or if there is something else going on. Please check with your doctor and see if there are other options. Sometimes home care will come in and give the meds as well.
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