Follow
Share

The next day she was ok, but now she can only whisper, has tremor in face and left arm, and stares a lot.

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
Find Care & Housing
My husband carried a card on him, and I carried one also, that said he was not to be given Haldol under any circumstances, and that in persons with this condition it may cause permanent damage or death. (This is available from the Lewy Body Dementia Association.) The trouble is, many, many patients don't have a more specific diagnosis than "dementia," so who knows if this warning might apply to them?

My husband's geriatrician held the strong opinion that Haldol should be BANNED from emergency rooms. There are other ways to calm a patient down, and there simply isn't enough history available to assess the risks in an emergency room.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Llama thank you. It was difficult. I must have misunderstood your comment to me on the previous page which I responded to at the top of this page. You are fairly new to this site and comments without knowing a person's story happen often. I try to check profiles of before I respond to a discission topic. Otherwise, I would likely let some people have it
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

gladimhere: Kudos to you! I don't know how you did it FOR TWO PEOPLE FOR THAT LONG! I know all about people THINKING THEY'RE HELPING. I had a cousin who had not called me in 45 yrs...she calls me while I'm living out of state with my mother! I wanted to say YOU ARE NOT HELPING ME, DON'T YOU THINK I'VE ALREADY THOUGHT OF THAT!!!!
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

I would say regarding the Haldol get your love one a second opinion or take her to a geriatric doctor who specializes in Alzheimer/dementia. You are obviously, concern and to ease your mind it would not hurt to seek another Dr.. Good Luck Joyce
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Ozark so true. Only us caregivers completely understand what we go through on a daily basis...It's a terrible way to feel 24 hrs a day/365... Wonder why I'm so screwy.. Lol
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Maybe seeking another Dr to re-evaluate her might be better. My mom is taking Aricept, Trazadone which helped for a minute her delusions and now she is taking Nuedexta its pretty new and helping the rough edges. For now she is stable mentally and I just hope she stays like this! I wish you luck with your love one. joyce
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Check out the website "WebMD" I've found it to be very informative. It explains the purpose of the drug, side-effects, drug-interactions, and more. I've shared the information from this site with my family doctor BEFORE, DURING and AFTER a prescription was being written up for my parents. It helped clarify what types of drugs were better than others and what side-effects we would be avoiding . Good luck to you.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Llama, I know about burn out. I just finished four years of 24/7 caregiving for my mom with Alzheimer's and her husband with mobility and general age related decline in a very dysfunctional family. The most diffocult part was dealing with siblings unending onslaught that eventually ended up in court where it was ruled that my mom would remain in my care until I said enough.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

gladimhere::You would burnout with 24/7 caregiving, especially if must repeat your tasks EVERY DAY like I did. Could not keep up with my mother.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

you got the politically correct!!
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Can I loan my soapbox to you, Glad, so that you can continue with the truth and heartfelt realities of Alzheimers disease. Someone better speak up about what it is like for everyone living it every day, and their loved ones.
You go girl!
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

And you know, I really tire of people tiptoeing around this disease! It is dreadful for not just the person afflicted with it, but their families as well, and everybody that they come in contact with. And the portrayals through rose colored glasses, people afraid to say what it is really like because of what people with think they are not compassionate, loving, caring, patient, you name it! Only a caregiver knows what this disease does and understands what caregivers endure each and every day! We could all use a bit more of a backbone. Until we speak and are heard the fairy tales will continue. Enough soapbox for today.
Helpful Answer (3)
Report

William55, what you describe sounds like seizure activity and should be reported to the MD immediately to find out why it is happening. There are other drug options out there.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Gotta agree with you Gladimhere. As un-PC or as ugly as it sounds, I spend all day watching Alzheimer's instill imagined fears, tears & unquenchable anxiety into my mother & go to bed every night praying the Lord will quietly & painlessly take her home during the night. It's the ugly truth of Alzheimer's that we hope for a devastating stroke or heart attack because either one would actually release our loved ones from the tortured world they live in & rid them of their emotional & mental pain.
Helpful Answer (3)
Report

Or politically correct. Political correctness, thanks for the hint CM!
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Ahhh, politically correctness never was my strong suit!
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

I agree, Reno. Glad is telling it as it is, not as it ought to be. Unfortunately, that doesn't make the 'as it is' any less of a disgrace. Any policy makers out there with proposals for a better solution?
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Reno,
PC? Power control, personal computer, planning commission?
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Gladimheregiveahug: way to tell it like it is without worrying about being PC.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Not approved? It probably has a black box warning about increased risk. This is where the risk/benefit needs to be evaluated. I imagine if we all could provide low cost 24/7 care for our loved ones less haldol would be needed. They would have constant companionship and maybe would need fewer drugs to control behaviors. But, that is not reality. These places are terribly understaffed. And the meds help our loved ones feel more comfortable. They have dementia! I hope something happens, a stroke a heart attack will take my mom instead of watching this long, very slow decline of my mom. That is what she would want too!
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

William55: Haldol is not approved for dementia patients who are elderly.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Haldol is administered in Nursing Homes as a chemical restraint. It's sad, because the side effects are many, and generally cause more confusion in the elderly. You really need to find out WHY it was given!
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

I hate all the drugs they are using on the elderly. My Partner never took any drugs and only took Vitamins. He was a clean slate. The drugs worked on him immediately and scared the heck out of me. But, Hospice kept telling me that I could give all the drugs in the DRUG PACK and it would not kill him. I had a hard time believing that. He was comfortable, I will give them that. But, it was really hard for me to give him drugs. I kept a journal of what I gave and how often and dose. Check out the drug, be familiar with the side affects and have an OPEN CONVERSATION with your doctor. Well if the patient is on Hospice, then the Nurse assigned to you. I understand your apprehension.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

I cannot understand why she was given Haldol as it is an antipsychotic. Was she uncontrollable? Yes, she will have residual side effects. Try to find out why the doctor ordered this drug. It is nasty (and I know from personal experience).
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

Frankly, I'm quite surprised they gave Haldol at all. It's actually frowned upon in my state for the elderly/dementia symptoms & nursing homes will do everything they can to get a patient OFF Haldol. That said, the dose isn't necessarily high...depending on the patient's body weight & general condition. And from the symptoms you're describing, it sounds like she's having what are known as extrapyramidal side effects...and Haldol should NOT be given at that dose again...if at all.
Helpful Answer (3)
Report

It has been my experience that Haldol is not the drug of choice for dementia. One of the possible side effects is called Tardive Dyskinesia, which doesn't always go away once the medication is stopped. Your mother's symptoms sound similar to this. I am NOT a Dr. It tmight be worth familiarizing yourself with that side effect and then asking your Dr. his opinion.
.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

The dose of haldol isn't the problem. It's a low dose. However, haldol has a sedative effect, an most anti-psychotic meds are not recommended for use with the elderly, due the unpredictable nature of the effects on the elderly. Long term use of haldol often cause tremors (regardless of age), an the "spacey" staring off in space could very well be cause by it as well. Haldol is use to treat hallucinations, but it is also use for irritation or as a sleeper by some docs.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

If you do a google search for haldol dosage .5 mg three times daily is initial and maintenance dosages that are appropriate per the drgs site. Any medication is difficult to determine what is appropriate for elders and especially those with dementia. Was the med given orally or intravenously? Intravenous meds take effect much quicker and also wear off much quicker, the reason for self administed morphine pumps in hospitals. It is almost completely unpredictiable how any medication is going to effect the elderly, particulary those with dementia. Long term effects are nearly impossible to guage what they might be or how long they will last. What you are seeing may be a result of the haldol but maybe another cause. If it is the drug is causing what you are seeing she could bounce back rather quickly.

Why was she given the haldol? Is she in the hospital or other type of facility?
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.