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In the state of Texas? My mother was able to walk and talk. and do things for herself but when I was working she collected stuff, where there was only room to walk in. I had a care giver, that work for a company that is closed now.They brought in this guardian group acting like friends, and started taking pictures with out permission and no warrant. Then they brought in attorney acting like a friend . I had to ask if he was attorney. He admitted he was. They took me to court and took all legal rights away from me.Now the judge put her in a convilent home, and they accuse me first of hitting my mom, which I didn't, and they could not prove that, then they accuse me of cussing at my mom, which I didn't. Which there was no proof. I found out that they were over medicating my mom. What can I do to get control back of my mom, and get out of the convilent Home and control of the power of attroney again?

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ya really never want to argue with a medical professional . medicine is way too complicated for anyone with less than a masters degree or two to understand . my poa cousin made a scene at nh and threatened a law suit . cute . sue a limited liability corporation . if you could ever win the payoff would be from their " take a penny - leave a penny " tray ..
you make friends with medical professionals by putting your trust in them .
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My heart goes out to you, cowgirls. You work hard to support yourself. Your mom got sick and you made time in your life to try to take care of her. You have been working on cleaning out her hoardings. If it is all junk it can go fairly quickly, but if there is good stuff mixed in with the junk and you have to sort things it can take a long time. You were doing the best you could, and wanted the best for your mother. You were even cooperating with the Adult Protection Services folks.

At some point it apparently became clear to some agency (APS?) that your mom's welfare was at risk. That might have been because of the hoarding or other conditions in the house, or simply the fact that she now needs more care than you can provide and also work full time. It is expensive to place a citizen in a care center, and it is only done when it seems necessary. I understand how hard this must be for you, after how much you tried to take care of her, but now you have a chance to relate to her as the loving daughter, and not have to worry about her daily care.

Just being in a different place will confuse your mom for a while, and that can effect her behavior. If she is on new medications it may take a while to fine tune the dosage and find what is the right amount for her. Different people react differently to the same drug. It is possible to over-medicate someone unintentionally and the solution is to make adjustments as needed.

Have breakfast with mom before you go to work, or stop in after work for a brief visit, or drop in to say goodnight. Visit at different times of the day and get to know the staff on each shift. You might not be her POA any more, but you are still her daughter and still able to help her be comfortable.

She is not being punished. You are not being punished. Someone is trying to look after her welfare. Work within the situation as it is. Take care of yourself. Keep loving your mother!
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It would be difficult to impossible to get her back. An independent Guardian is only appointed if family is unwilling or unable to serve. A Ward is placed in a convalescent home by the Judge only if the home is unsafe or unclean. A lawsuit against the convalescent home? It's not going to happen because you have no POA or any legal standing to represent her. If you love your mother, stop making trouble or you will be banned from seeing her by the Judge. Clean up your house, drop any thoughts of a lawsuit and realize mom is in a safe place, a clean place and you don't have time to care for her.
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I pieced together that the county probably removed her because the house was deemed unsafe. She is probably in a nursing home and they are medicating her because she is upset. This is all perfectly legal if the circumstances warranted it. The county and state wouldn't have any interest in removing your mother from her home, cowgirls, unless they thought the conditions were not safe. Problems hoarders often have are fall hazards, mold, mice and rats, unsanitary bathroom conditions, and hoarded outdated food. The only thing you can do is work with them for the good of your mother. They will let you know what you need to do to enjoy the privilege to visit. If it is the county or state and you are difficult, they will choose not to deal with you. So take a few days to calm down and work with them for the good of your mother.
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Private guardians don't appear our of nowhere to take people away. You were already working with APS so there was a problem that you and they were working on. Did they explain that whether or not it was you or mom who was hoarding that this was not an acceptable place for her to live? How did someone become a guardian without you even knowing about it? I don't think you are at the top of your game yourself. Something is wrong with the way you are describing the situation. It may have been a worse situation than you realized. It's hard to imagine that you would recognize over medication or how you would KNOW that it is occurring. What in the world are the papers you need from the state to start a lawsuit against the place caring for your mother? What about the guardian? Does he work there? I think you should go to your own doctor, describe what's been going on, get a complete checkup, and get medicated and get counseling. I doubt if your mom is coming back to you. Have seen her since she was taken away? How long ago did this take place? And you still haven't finished cleaning out the house? You are not going to get your way kiddo.
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i am not the horrid, my mom was, and the adult protective service was working with me. This was a private guardian . I found out the place my mom is at was being over medicated. They are still over medicating her. I am waiting for some papers from the state to start a law suit against the convelisting home
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In short, absolutely nothing. The matter has been adjudicated and sans lots of money and time, it's out of your hands.

I cleaned out a two-bedroom, 2-bath, hoarder house with a full basement and walk-up attic by myself while I was on chemotherapy for breast cancer. It took me three days. As much as I hate to read between the lines here? I think you yourself were part of the problem.

If you were not (I'm making a big assumption here, by the way), then you were overwhelmed.

While I was lamenting my task as the cleaner-outer of this hoarder home, I spoke with a village employee who came over to do an inspection. He told me a story: He's always driving around the village on task. One day, as he was driving around, he saw an old man standing at the front door looking out the large window in the door and waving. He waved back.

Three days later, neighbors called police. He was found pinned to the front door by junk that had fallen in on him. Quite dead.

Hoarder homes are dangerous. They're often feces-invested filthy messes stacked floor to ceiling with nothing but, pardon the expression, crap. If your mom was doing this to the extent that social services got involved, they felt you were over your head with your responsibilities and did what they did for the safety of your mom.

Jessie's got the right idea. Make nice. So you can visit mom unhindered. Leave it alone and try hard to let it go...
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I'm sure you love your mom, but living in a hoarded house isn't healthy for anyone. So until you get that cleaned up, your mom is probably better off where she is. You must have gotten some documentation from the people who came in and investigated your mom's situation and took her to court. Did you ask them how you could get your mom back? Have you called them or asked them what steps you need to take? You must have phone numbers for them, don't you?

The first step I'd take is to get rid of the hoard. If you can't do that, I don't think you'd ever stand a chance of getting your mom back home.
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i WAS WORKING LONG HOURS, AND WHEN SHE GOT SICK, i TOOK CARE OF HER. I GOT THE HOUSE CLEAN UP, BUT TWO ROOMS, AND I AM WORKING ON THEM. ON MY DAYS OFF I HAD TO GO AND BUY GROCERIES, PAID BILLS, AND DO YARD WORK. i only had the weekend off, and I DID EVERYTHING ON THOSE TWO DAYS. i HAD TO BE AT WORK BY 7:00 a.m. AND DID NOT GET HOME UNTIL 6:00 P.M. OR LATER.
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I'm a bit more sympathetic, because I realize hoarding is such a difficult problem to handle. Even professionals have a hard time talking someone into getting rid of their hoard. A hoard does make it dangerous for an elder person, especially one with dementia. What happened may be the best thing, since trying to manage the hoard was not working. In your shoes, cowgirls, I would work with the guardians the best I could to try to make sure I could visit my mother. If your mother makes things up, such as abuse, just let them know it isn't true. People with dementia can be very inventive with their tales.

Good luck! I hope you'll be able to visit your mother as much as you would like.
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Sounds like the situation at home got reported to Adult Protective Services because of the hoarding conditions. Your having the Power of Attorney doesn't seemed to have worked well for mom because you allowed those conditions to occur and apparently didn't understand that this was not a good situation. So the government stepped in and took over to protect her. Your judgment regarding your mother is lackjng and you and she are best off living separately. Support her and look out for her but don't try to "get control" of her again. Go to the doctor yourself and find out why you felt hoarding was ok. Do you now live in the hoarded house yourself? Take care of yourself before you try to do it for anyone else.
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Very interesting, who on earth was this "guardian group"?
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