Is there a "Guidebook for New Caregivers"?

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In just the short amount of time I've been a member, I've seen this topic come up on several threads: the lack of a comprehensive and easy to use resource for new caregivers that can help them find their way through the complicated and exhausting world of caregiving. Is there a good one out there already? How about an online resource that pulls together the wealth of knowledge our posters have contributed? A checklist for new potential caregivers, that "examines the conscience" to see if they're really up to what they will be facing? Wish I had the time to do it!

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I much prefer to read fantasy books rather than educational or true life ones. I've decided that the only way I will read these books is to take turns. I read one mystery book. After that, an Alzheimer book. After that, another mystery book. I've had the Elder Rage book for about 2 years unopened. When I started this taking turns of books, I was finally able to read it. Took me about 2 weeks because although interesting, it was not entertaining enough to keep my concentration.

Anyway, I'm now reading another Alzheimer book. Love Never Sleeps by Mary Summer Rain. It's not what you're asking on a guidebook for new caregiver. It's about her roommate bringing to their home her mother who had cognitive problems that no longer allowed her to live on her own. The first part of the book is the roommate's story. They had to keep changing their lives and their home to adjust as her mom's dementia increased. The wandering at night in the house and finally outside to the woods (which they live in the isolated country - wolves, etc..) She wanted to build an addition to their home for mom using mom's money but her sibling dissented. So, that was out. The mom's beginning paranoia that they're taking her money, etc... As I read the book, I can't help but see my mom's actions with her mom's. I'm only on page 47 out of 365 pages.
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Zoo, the website here sometimes does bunch the good posts [mainly the most popular depending on how many times the "helpful Answer" is clicked] within a single main original posting. I usually want to read all the answers, that way the postings are more in order, separating them out can get confusing especially if someone is answering an early posting that doesn't make it to the most popular group.
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buklvr: I agree, this site save my life and I've found it to be the most useful resource. However, it's very cumbersome to have to search for a topic and then read through so many different threads before you find what you were really looking for. Of course there are the issues with people tacking onto older posts instead of creating new ones, and going off-topic is common, and that complicates the search. There's got to be a better way of organizing the topics, or perhaps selecting the most useful posts and placing them in a permanent "look here first" category or link. Thanks to everyone that's posted references to some of the books out there. I hope those and more posts will help newbies that are looking for help for the first time, find it faster. As we all know, finding the time to do research is a luxury, so the faster someone can find the answers or advice they are looking for, the better.
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^^ oh the book I recommended has a newer 3rd edition, 2014. "It's a one-stop resource for all the medical, financial, housing, emotional, and practical issues."
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One book I am using for reference is titled "How to Care for Aging Parents" written by Virginia Morris, c2004. It gives tips for daily living. Of course, it all depends if one can incorporate those tips to our own aging parents or a spouse.
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And occasionally there are free online classes through Coursera. This is the last week of the second class offered. And it us taught by experts in the field of dementia care at Johns Hopkins University. I believe you could still take the class, and at your own pace. The course materials will remain online for awhile even after the class finishes.

https://www.coursera.org/course/dementiacare
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Jolene Brackey, her book is one I quote from often, it helps me as a caregiver for ADW
"Creating Moments of Joy"
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"A Common Sense Guide to Alzheimer's Care Kisses for Elizabeth is written for both family and professional caregivers of people with Alzheimer's disease and other dementias. It is a practical resource for anyone experiencing difficulty with significant behavioral issues but is also helpful to caregivers who simply want to provide the best possible care.

The author has developed 15 common sense guidelines which address a wide variety of concerns by helping caregivers to solve problems or even prevent them. The guidelines also address negative behaviors such as wandering, combativeness, paranoia and sundowning. The book explains what dementia is, how it affects people who suffer from it and why these behaviors occur.

Stephanie D Zeman MSN RN has included over 40 true heartwarming stories about her patients with dementia and ways in which the guidelines were applied to help resolve their problems and enhance the individuals quality of life
Since one of the best ways to learn is by example,

Stephanie D Zeman MSN RN has included over 40 true heartwarming stories about her patients with dementia and ways in which the guidelines were applied to help resolve their problems and enhance the individuals quality of life."

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Over the years have got to know Stephanie Z on https://alzconnected.org/ forum. This an excellent group for caregivers
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I just purchased a Harvard Med School report/booklet "A guide to coping with Alzheimer's Disease" My first quick read shows a really good and useful publication.

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36 Hour day is tough and good
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AARP also has a handbook. Living near Sarasota County in Fl (demographics shown as one of the "oldest" counties in US) there are many resources available - I found going to a support group the thing that saved my sanity!
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Your question so reminded me of how I found this site. My dad was the main caregiver of bedridden mom. He got a stroke and became bedridden, too. I went from secondary support caregiver to now main caregiver for both parents. I felt so inadequate on this new role. I googled, "how to care for elderly bedridden parents."

Like Glad said, most of what I learned was from reading all over this site. I read topics that had nothing to do with my situation. I spent the whole 3 day weekend reading and reading. Weeks just reading everything. I learned about POAs, APS, etc...

But this doesn't cover all of it. I have found some real knowledge when I was on leave and stayed home to be there to meet mom's caregivers who come to sponge bathe. I asked questions about this and that. When I met with dad's social worker, I also asked questions. When mom was in the hospital, I watched the nurses, asked questions nicely so that I learn why they were doing what they did.

I have never read 'The 36 Hour Day'. But that book has been recommended by the Alzheimer associations and even among the medical communities dealing with dementia.
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