My brother has legal guardianship over mom and has a fit when talking about getting an aide for her. What can I do?

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My mother (90) has dementia with a few good days, but mostly bad. My single 56 y/o brother lives with her in her house, she still owns. He has legal guardianship over her. My brother has Parkinson's Disease. He does not work, is on disability. He's had Parkinson's for about 6 years now. He's on several medications that I believe make him spaced out and not make the right choices for mom. Mom does not have a caregiver. I try to help out as much as I can. I work full time. My other 2 sisters will not help out. My Mom is very stubborn, mean, and is very difficult to handle. She needs a walker and help getting up and down because he knees give out. She's fallen many times. I've stopped by moms house after I get off from work when possible to check on her. Sometimes I find her on the floor. Mom will use the stove to boil water for coffee. I'm afraid she will burn herself or set the house on fire. My brother doesn't think this is an issue. I have found her on the floor a few times when I came into the house. Although my brother says he lives with her, he will leave her alone while he goes to his house to do things around his house. He puts a sign on the counter top for my mom to read "I'll be back at 5:00". Leaving her alone all afternoon. He tells me she sleeps when he's gone. Mom also has Macular Degeneration. I get so upset because Mom is not getting the care she needs. She should not be left alone. My brother has a quick mean and vulgar temper. When I try to talk to him about having someone come in to bath her or cut her toenails he has an outrageous fit. What can I do.

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How long ago was brother appointed guardian? Did he have Parkinson's then? Has anything else changed since then?

I think that you are going to need to consult a lawyer about this.
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Hire a lawyer and contest the guardianship. It's a big step and a lot of work. Make sure you want the responsibility.
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