How can I get guardianship for mom without the expense of hiring attorney?

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In my case this whole thing started because my mom stated she wanted to change her POA's. But I had told the attorney that mom had Alzheimers. He chatted with her for a bit and decided he could not make the changes. I suppose I could have looked for a different attorney, but if the change had been made, that would have been challenged in court by the POA, so now it is a conservator/guardian proceeding based on numerous defaults under the POA by the POA. Once you start as POA, you cannot pick and choose what duties you will carry out, it is all of them.
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jeannegibbs, I was basing my answer on a court appointed DPOA. But, even if the person is competent, a Durable POA does require the original DPOA to be notified, and the new document has to be recorded.

How to Change Power of Attorney
A power of attorney is a legal instrument by which you appoint someone you trust, known as your attorney-in-fact, to act on your behalf. It may be necessary at some point to remove or change the person you have named as your attorney-in-fact. Depending on the circumstances, ending the authority granted to one attorney-in-fact and appointing another may simply be a matter of preparing the paperwork and giving notice.

Step 1
Prepare a new power of attorney appointing a different attorney-in-fact to act on your behalf. This power of attorney should state that it is revoking any prior powers of attorney executed by you, thereby terminating the original attorney-in-fact’s authority.

Step 2
Prepare a separate revocation or notice of revocation of power of attorney. Even if your new power of attorney revokes your older one, giving immediate written notification of revocation may be wise if there has been misconduct or mistrust between you and your attorney-in-fact.

Step 3
Provide copies of the new power of attorney or notice of revocation to parties with whom you normally transact business and make sure they understand that your prior attorney-in-fact no longer has authority to legally act for you. Provide a copy to the attorney-in-fact who is being removed. Laws in some states protect financial institutions and other parties who rely on a power of attorney without knowledge of its revocation.

Step 4
Record the new power of attorney and/or the revocation of the old in the county’s land records to give the public notice of the change. It is particularly important to record the revocation if the original power of attorney was placed of record. Just as the recording of the power of attorney gave public notice of the attorney-in-fact’s appointment, the same is true of her withdrawal or termination.
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unikornfairy, as long as a person is legally competent, he or she can change their DPOA as often as they want to. The former DPOA does not have to consent.

It is a different matter if the person has been declared by a court to be incompetent.
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DPOA can't be changed unless you agreed to it. Once you have it, the only way to change it is through the courts and they have to notify you before that can happen. The person whom you acquired it from no longer has a say in who makes legal decisions for them as they gave that power to you. You need to speak to a lawyer in her behalf quickly, I fear that money may be the issue and it will soon be gone.
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As you can see, a POA can be changed without your knowledge. In Guardianship, the court requires an independent evaluation of the person and appoints a permanent guardian if it is needed. The person appointed (me) has to undergo fingerprint and background check. Other possible guardians (my sisters) have to sign off and agree to the appointment. In the long run, this protects both the guardian and the person needing guardianship. They can't be swayed by another person without going back before the judge. Yes, it is expensive, but it is airtight protection for everyone involved.
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oops I posted this as an answer, re- posted... sorry
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I had a POA/DPOA for my biological Aunt. 88 yrs (Stage 4 refused treatment) I had been taking care of her for about 6 months then I had to get back to work. Another niece(by marriage) offered to take care of her temporally. While I was out of town in July my Aunt fell and broke her hip.. No phone call to me. I found out the first of Sept finally after several text and voice mail messages and refusing to give her any $ until I spoke or saw her. I just happened to find out the "new" Dr. name, again no discussion about a "new" Dr. I went to the Dr. office..With my POA/DPOA in hand.. They would not give me any info on my Aunt's well being. Because that niece had gotten a POA without my knowledge. Now, my Aunt has a bit of dementia. Showed up unannounced at her house, she calls the police! And I find out my Aunt is on her 3rd round of chemo, which she refused,in Dr's writing 1 year ago!! She also had her SS changed to another acct. Is all this legal? What can be my next step?
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I went to AVVO and was told I had to hire an attorney, that it was a long process and expensive to get guardianship. I would try POA if that will work for what you need.
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Go to your Superior Court which has a Probate court, and there you will find papers to file. There even is a provision, if you have no money, to forego the court's filing costs. There are about $250 last time I checked (1998).
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Check out AVVO, It is a website that rates attorneys, and you can ask and receive answers to questions free of charge. Also, if it is due to financial difficulties for you mom, if you have POA you can retain an attorney for her at low or no cost through what is called Legal Aid in my area. Or if you have financial difficulty, there is free legal help available. Call your local agency on aging, often through regional governments, called council of governments that can direct you to sources for the help you need.
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