A guardian was appointed for my Dad because of family fighting. Does he have any rights?

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My dad lives alone and takes his own medicine.. He has mild ALZ. Since the guardian was appointed he is not allowed to say who he wants to have over or who he wants to go to breakfast with. Everything is controlled for him. In court, he named 2 daughters he wanted as a guardian if he had to have one. The judge ignored him and gave guardianship to another daughter whom he didn't want.

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Well, thanks to voice recognition, that came out funky.

or they may SEEM making mild

the courtroom is THEIR stage
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Judges have so much authority, you have no idea. You can pretty much bet they are operating within the latitude of the law, but a lot of what they do doesn't always make sense. They maybe outrageous or flamboyant, or day may CWM meek and mild. But after a while on the bench, there's no getting around that it can become a power trip, and the courtroom is there stage.
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What is really crazy is that my sister and I do not have anything negative in our backgrounds at all. The judge did not ask us one single question. There are 7 daughters and 5 sons. When the judge said my dad wanted me some of the siblings were loud and said, "No". That's all that was said. I can't believe a court proceeding could be handled like this. When I called for a transcript, they said there was no transcript from that day.There was no evidence against me at all.My sister who became guardian was asked 2 questions, neither one applied to how well she knows my dad.
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Here before a guardian is appointed they are required by the court to submit a credit report and criminal background check. This information is not optional even if it is a family member whether a child or other relative. The court had a reason for the appointment.
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The guardian since they were appointed by a judge, really can do whatever they think is best. You would have to document some sort of improper action to get them removed through a hearing.

Most of the time, the guardian will have to report to the court on a regular basis (how regular depends on your state law) a specific document showing how the person's funds or assets have been used. These should be public records obtainable through probate court (where most guardianship are heard) at your courthouse. Most courthouses have all filed documents down-loadable for a small fee. So you can look through these for things that may be questionable.

BUT for me, the bigger issue is why, if there were 3 kids, the court selected 1. What is it about this daughter that makes her more suitable??? or what is it about the other 2 that makes them unsuitable??? You kinda need to look hard at what might be in your or your sister's background that the judge viewed you all as unsuitable. You know the court can run a credit and background check on you & your family; they can run a crisscross on any property owned by you & your family. If there is something amiss….like any garnishments, judgements, bankruptcies, unpaid taxes, you have a kid with a juvee record, you are on any state welfare program or are unemployed (and the chosen one has substantial income or has a good job), you have had a felony record, etc; then you or anyone else in your household are looked at as not being suitable as a guardian.

Realize that the judge does NOT have to even select family to be guardian. They can and often do select a guardian who has undergone state training and does that for a living, like what GladImHere said. The judge has a list of them. Sometimes they are in the courtroom waiting to be selected when family starts in-fighting during the hearing. Judges really take no truck to having that in their courtroom and do a court appointed to put an end to that nonsense. My point is if there is something that could be an issue for your & your other sister's suitability, then having your sister appointed is probably better than an outsider. At least your & your sisters have a shared history with each other and your dad.
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Do you know what type of guardianship your father has? Is it partial or plenary? It makes a difference as to what rights your father retains. How does the guardian restrict visitors if your father lives alone?
Check your state's Patient's Bill of Rights. Even if a person is incapacitated, they still retain certain rights such as the right to have phone calls and visitors, unless it can be proven that the visitors would in some way be harmful to your father. You may want to contact your father's attorney.
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Guardians when appointed by the court are paid through the protected person's assets. In many cases the guardian is a social worker trained in working with the elderly. They may try to get a family to work together in the best interests of the elder, but sometimes it is a lost cause.
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Once a judge appoints a guardian or a conservator (often, tho not always, this is both "of the person" and "of the finances"), the patient has no more rights. They don't even have the right to vote.

Guardians or conservators MAY take the person's wishes into consideration, but they do not not HAVE to. They also don't have to listen to or consider other family members' request or suggestions.

There was a legal cost involved in getting the conservatorship in the first place. However, if the non-conservator family members feel that the conservator is inadequately or inappropriately taking care of the patient, they can at their own expense return to court with their complaints. But those complaints had better be fully documented, completely accurate and confirmed, generally by an unbiased party such as social services.

Sorry to be a doom-sayer but conservatorships are an ugly and costly business. Funny enough, they generally go pretty quickly if the patient has no money. When money is involved, the court and the lawyers drain off most of it, until there is not much more left. It's such a good idea to have the DPOAs & HPOAs set up in advance of dementia, but if there is disagreement with in the family, even those can be challenged.
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A person is not assigned a guardian because his family is fighting. Guardianship is assigned when a person is incompetent to handle his own affairs. Family fighting may influence who is assigned guardian.

"Mild" Alzheimer's is really early stage Alzheimer's. The disease progresses. It will not stay mild.
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Judges usually have very good reasons for skipping over a potential guardian. They will avoid anyone with a criminal/traffic record or a bad credit history or mental health issues. Guardians usually have the patient's interest in mind, will not ask for pay, keep track of healthcare and finances and report annually to the court. I suspect the two he skipped over were set aside for good reasons.
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