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Anna, perhaps you can create a bit of Australia here. If you have photos of your grandmother's home, that might help, although it could also go the other way and make her more nostalgic. Same with getting photos of other places in Australia, to try to create an Australian environment in her current living situation. Perhaps you could gradually bring in or put up photos, nothing too much at one time.

I think though that I would ask the doctor who diagnosed her dementia for his/her opinion.
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I agree with the other people. Dementia is clouding your grandmother's judgement. If she is stating she wants to go 'home', that may not actually mean she wants to move. She just wants to go to a place that feels more like 'home' but that place really no longer exists. She needs to 'age in place' as much as possible. My mother, in the earlier stages of dementia, said she would like to see her sisters (who live 2000 miles away). After planning for months, we took her to see her sisters, probably for the last time, and she was ready to leave after 3-4 hours. What she said she wanted, was not based on her current reality, but some confused, ideation of her past.
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Anna77: VERY BAD IDEA for an elder to make such a drastic move! Questions to strongly consider: does she have low vision (macular degeneration), how old is she?, who is going to live with?, and a lot more! A person with dementia does not get to make decisions!
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If she has dementia, are you sure she would be ok that far away? Who would take care of her? If something happened would you be able to comfort her?
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A person under legal guardianship (court ordered) is by law considered a vulnerable adult, and the state which issued the court order for guardianship often requires notice and approval to even move a loved one out of state, let alone out of the country. Also, a move does not release you from your duties to the state which issued the order, you still have the well-being reports etc. It could be accomplished if the plan is sufficient to meet her needs as a vulnerable adult, and not just her wants.
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If your grandmother wants to cash out her investment and move to Australia, I'm sure there are ways she can do it especially with global banking, but since you write that she has dementia, I would wonder if this is a real desire or a imaginary longing for home.

For someone with dementia to move from (I assume) the US to Australia is a major move and could cause the dementia to advance.

Are you her financial/legal guardian? Do you also handle her medical issues? If so, I would write a letter to the doctor who diagnosed dementia and ask his/her thoughts.

Does she have relatives, a home, a place to live in Australia? If not, would she literally be all alone by herself? Are you as her guardian going with her? That's a pretty frightening thought for a GM with dementia.

More details would help get more precise answers, though, especially Sunnygirl's questions on the legal issues and guardianship venue.
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I'm not sure what you are referring to. Does she live in Australia now? Was the guardianship set up in Australia or trust? Without knowing more, I would say that a consultation with an attorney in the country in question would be a good start. As her guardian, there are legal requirements for what you are supposed to do. An attorney could point that out to you and explain how it might apply to your case.
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