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We tried the alarm, both wireless and otherwise. It scares her but doesn't keep her from getting up. She has 24hr/day care, but there are times you have to leave the room and when you do she gets right up. No matter how many times you tell her to use the walker or not get up at all, she does. Does anyone know of something we can use to keep her from getting up without literally tying her to the chair? I would like to maintain her dignity. Thank you.

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Hi. I wonder what it is that your grandmother is getting up to get or do. I am concerned that you might be feeling like your grandmother always has the same level of understanding, all the time. If the dementia is making her impulsive, then you will not be able to rely on her to remember from moment to moment. I believe that is why one supporter suggested giving her something to hold - to distract her briefly while the caregiver uses the restroom. As a speech therapist, i have seen picture or picture word prompts might help. It may be a picture of her in her recliner, maybe a picture of a grandmother getting out if a chair, maybe with a x over it then an arrow to another picture of a grandmother that has fallen down - maybe with the words, "Let us help you get up. You don't want to fall."

Good Luck to you.
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Assuming that you are accurately assessing your grandmother level of dementia, the first thing to ask is what medications does your grandmother take? They could be responsible for her falling. Secondly, she needs to be exercised under supervision which is likely to help her build strength and balance.
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Can you put the feet up on the recliner and Gma can't get it down? Might keep her put for a brief time. Stiffen up the handle so she can't work it independently and lift the leg support up and rock the chair back into recline. Put it back down when you are back in the room.
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We leave the walker right by Mom's chair. She'd have to walk around it. She still thinks it's only for old people, but I think she finally realizes that she's more secure with it. What she really wants is for one of us to walk beside her holding her up and her holding on to us with a death grip. As long as she can walk with the walker, we are going to go that route, except for the odd occasion when the walker isn't appropriate.
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Yes, we've asked her why she doesn't use the walker and she says "I forgot". She does have trouble getting out of the chair, but somehow she manages, but then we she get up, she's too weak to walk really and falls so easy.

I didn't realize they made trays for different types of chairs besides wheelchairs. I will have to look into that.

Thank you for responding to my post.
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When MIL was in rehab, they could not keep her from falling and she refused to wait for the call button. So they got her in a wheelchair and yup, the tray was on there and she was parked at the nurses' station. Similar trays are available for recliners and sofas, ones that need YOU to slide them out of her way.
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Have you asked her why she doesn't want to use the walker? My mom says they're "for old people". She's 93! But she uses it anyway. I'm thinking about buying a Rollator type of walker to see if she'll like it better. I'm afraid it will get away from her because she'll have 4 wheels instead of 2. She walks humped over.

Does your grandmother not have any issues with getting up out of the chair? It takes mom so long to get up (we let her do it on her own as much as possible) that we are usually back in the room before she's able to get up. We have to remind her to skootch forward and put her feet under her knees and push up using the arms. So it takes her a while, but she does it and that's good. Not looking forward to the day when she can no longer get up under her own power.
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Hi, well she sits in a recliner so don't know if it would be possible to put a table in front of her, but it's a good idea. She's does not have advanced dementia - I would say moderate. She's not ready for a doll. She's aware enough. Thank you for your response. I appreciate people taking the time to give suggestions.
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Poor grandma! Port you! Sometimes in my mom's NH, I see residents who are seared in a wheelchair with a table attachment. Would putting a heavy table in front of Gma prevent her from trying to rise out of the chair? Would giving her a baby doll to "take care of" for a few minutes while the caregiver uses the restroom work?
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