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So far, I've gotten two phone calls from credit card companies telling me that my grandma asked them to call me because I handle her finances. All I do is make sure her phone bills are paid. Her credit card debt is over my head. The only thing I've even seen or known about was a Capital One card with 16k on it and a bank card who just told me had 2k on it. Neither one of them's ever going to be paid. Mom has no money in her account because she keeps getting cash out and not knowing where she's spending it (I've already stopped her debit card because someone else besides her was using it, but it wasn't fraud cause she let them) All I'm trying to do is keep money in the account so she can afford to live in a DECENT home, but it leaves just as quickly as social security goes in.

So, my question is can these creditors really expect a payment? Her account may only have on average 300 bucks a month and she only gets paid in a pension & social security. However, there's no money for a lawyer because she keeps getting out waay to much cash. I live on $80 cash for myself. I give my grandma a few hundred as her initial budget...spends it, then goes to get more. Then when her auto-bills come out the account is overdrawn.

I don't want to be responsible for her d**n credit cards. Legally, I'm not but I don't want them calling me either.

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You are doing the best you can and asking when you do not know. Most people who have POA dont know shxt when they start. You will be OK, just try to keep from being hard on yourself. Whether you belive in good karma or divine intervention, things will work out.
best of luck.
l
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Thanks for your insight you guys, but I'm going to have to take Pam's advice. Problem is, Ismiami, I am power of attorney but I don't know what the shit I'm doing. As far as I know, all this debt they're trying to collect occurred before there was even a PoA. The cards have all since been either cancelled or charged off and I never used them. She used them all because I guess she couldn't afford anything, and then she still...couldn't afford anything so she never paid them. The trick now is hiring a lawyer to negotiate with the creditors on my behalf, or sign my grandma up for bankruptcy. I don't know exactly what to tell them.
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The cardholder referred them to you, I am sure they wrote that in the file and will likely call again. Just let them know you are not the POA and grandma is confused. Yes, they will continue to try to collect, the money is rightfully due and the cardholder is directing them to you.
Smart - not to commingle funds - keep that up. BTW, NEVER sign for anything on their cards, some old CC agreements had a clause that stated if anyone used the card, they were liable for the balance.
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I live separate from my grandmother and our money is in no way connected. She lives with one of her nieces right now and pays rent. Her home foreclosed two years ago.
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OMG, I just googled HARGEDENBLARGHEN and didn't get anything.

But besides that, it sounds like you have a mom and a grandmom who can't manage money. And, yes, the creditors do expect to get paid. The sheriff can show up at your door eventually. You must keep your own funds separate and have an official arrangment in place for being paid as a caregiver. They could consider bankruptcy if reputable debt consolidation/credit counseling and ADHERENCE to a budget they recommend does not happen. If they are not capable of living on a budget, and are hemorrhagining cash to late fees and overdraft fees, protect yourself first, before going to their aid via POA or guardianships, and maybe, depending on what the fees are, ask the bank to switch to NOT paying overdrafts. That limits the fees somewhat depending on how it is set up. How are you keeping utilities on? Are they using any local food pantries for groceries, etc.?
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OK, so get a hold of the county office of the aging and get a credit counselor to consolidate her combined debt, and pay it off with 10%, with no further access to credit of any kind. That should get them all off your back.
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Thanks. My cousin and I recently talked about a MUCH tighter budget so my grandma won't have as much cash on hand, and if I could, would block cash withdrawls from her account. The bank told me that it's an all or nothing deal and I don't want to afford my time to block & unblock the account before bills are due.

Anyway, I would rather them take 10% of her pension. It's not much. Neither is 10% of her entire income. After calculating her WHOLE income it, it would be like $197 a month. That would be okay if it were for 1 credit card, but there might be more than 2 out there. I haven't had anyone else call me yet. I don't want to chase this but it's probably no good to wait for them to call me either.
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They can go to court and garnishee up to 10% of her pension. So pay them those small amounts each month. Send them a written letter explaining her dementia and asking for a closeout of all credit offer a repayment plan that is 10% of income, divided by both creditors. Do your best to keep her away from cash, whatever it takes, because if she needs Medicaid, cash is not trackable and a big problem.
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